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Do I need Academic or General Training IELTS

Do I need Academic or General Training IELTS?

Do I need Academic or General Training IELTS?

Do I need Academic or General Training IELTSAs you probably know, there are two types of IELTS test – the Academic Module and the General Training Module IELTS test. One of the most common questions we hear from candidates about to being their IELTS preparation is Do I need Academic or General Training IELTS? Here’s some useful advice that will help you decide!


IELTS for migration to an English speaking country

If you are planning to move to an English speaking country, you will often have a choice of which IELTS test you take. However, there are a number of points to keep in mind. If you plan to work in a professional job when you get to your new home, you will often need to take the Academic IELTS (see ‘Professional registration’ below). However, many people find it easier to take the General Training Module, and with all the stress of moving to a new country, you might want to choose the General Training Module to make life easier! If you have an immigration agent, it is always worth checking to make sure though!

IELTS for professional registration

Are you a doctor, nurse, lawyer, dentist or in another professional occupation? Often you will find that English speaking countries require IELTS as proof of your English ability, and if you are registering as a professional you will need the Academic Module.

IELTS for overseas study

If you are going to another country to study, then you will need the Academic Module IELTS test. The exact score you need will depend on the institution you are going to study at, and the course you are taking. For a Masters Degree, for example, you may be asked for a Band 7 or even higher, but to simply study English you may only need a Band 5 (and sometimes no IELTS result at all!). It’s always best to get written confirmation from the school or institution you are applying to before you start preparing.

Do you have a different situation? Post about it below and we’ll give you the best answer we’ve got!

task1-model-answer

IELTS Academic Task 1 Writing model answer 023

IELTS Academic Task 1 Writing model answer 23

 

IELTS Academic Task 1 Writing model answer 23

You should spend about 20 minutes on this task.

The line graph shows carbon emissions from different sources over a number of years.

Summarise the information by selecting and reporting the main features, and make comparisons where relevant.

Write at least 150 words.

The graph illustrates 5 sectors responsible for varying levels of emission of carbon dioxide in the UK over a 30 year period.

Of the given sources, industrial combustion and power stations remained the highest throughout the period given, although both declined overall, with power stations falling from a peak of just under 60 million tonnes in 1980 down to just over 40 million tonnes in 2000 and industrial combustion falling from approximately 65 million tonnes down to less than 45 million tonnes.

Both domestic production of carbon dioxide and the category labelled ‘others’ showed relatively little change over the period, beginning and ending at roughly the same level of 35 and 12 million tonnes respectively.

The only source of carbon dioxide to show a marked rise over the period came from transport, nearly doubling from just over 20 million tonnes to nearly 40.

Overall, it is evident from the graph that where some sectors declined, others remained steady and one increased in emissions over the thirty year span.

(168 words)

 

Top 10 tips for learning IELTS vocabulary

Top 10 tips for learning IELTS vocabulary

 

Top 10 tips for learning IELTS vocabulary

Tip 1: Don’t try to learn too many new words at once

Top 10 tips for learning IELTS vocabulary

Making long lists of words is often not a very successful technique. Words and definitions can become mixed and confused. Focus on only 10 new words at one time, practicing and using them as much as possible. When you are confident you know them, find another 10 words and repeat the process.

Tip 2: Keep a vocabulary list

Make a short list of words that you want to learn, and keep that list with you wherever you go. A pocket-sized notebook, or the ‘notes’ function on a mobile phone, is a good way to start. You can also pin short lists of words around the house – above your bed, next to your computer, even in the back of the bathroom door! Keep your list well organised, with a clear structure. For example:

WORD WORD FAMILY SENTENCE
keyboard Noun I think it is easier to use a keyboard than write by hand.

 

You can also add a translation of the word in your own language, but be careful. Although this can be useful at a lower level of English, the more advanced your English becomes, the more you will find that words are not exact matches between languages, and you can miss subtle differences.

Tip 3: Use the words in a sentence

Research has proven that putting a word in context in a sentence is much more effective than trying to learn a word on its own. Create sentences that are true about you and your life. For example, if you were trying to learn the word ‘garden’, then think about where you live – do you have a garden? Does anyone you know have a garden that you like? Your example sentence should be about something personal to you.

Tip 4: Use a dictionary

Although this is an obvious tip, you can make a dictionary more effective for you by getting into the habit of looking up new words. We recommend using a paper dictionary, as you can then put a clear mark beside the word in a bright coloured pen and look through the dictionary from time to time refreshing your memory. If you find you have forgotten the word, put it back on your list and write another sentence to help you.

Tip 5: Test yourself

Free vocabulary tests are widely available on the internet, on this website and on our free app. You should also ask a friend to help you (if you followed Tip 4, you can hand them your dictionary and ask them to find a word you have marked and ask you for the meaning – or they can give you the meaning and you tell them the word).

Tip 6: Use the new word

When you learn a new word, it is common to find that you suddenly start hearing or seeing the word a lot more, and it becomes easier to remember. However, there are also times when you learn a new word and then don’t see it or use for a long time, and this will cause is to forget. One way to help you remember the word is to repeat it 5 or 6 times in a row, repeating this pattern every day for three or four days – this will help seal the new word in your long term memory.

Tip 7: Use word families

If you learn a new word – for example, happy – then find all the words in the same family (happily, happiness). That way you can quickly expand your vocabulary.

Tip 8: Read widely

This is definitely the best way to learn new words. It is also good practice to check what the word may mean in context.

Tip 9: Use a variety of ways to remember new words.

You don’t have to write new words to remember them. Some words are better drawn as pictures or acted out like a play, and flash cards, with the word on one side and a definition on the other, can also be very handy. Don’t feel you need to use the same techniques over and over again.

Tip 10: Find your vocabulary level

It can be helpful to find out your level of vocabulary, so you have some idea of what level you are. English vocabulary can be split into different levels, so take a look at the vocabulary section of this site as well as following our Word of the day.

IELTS speaking practice test

IELTS speaking practice test 2

IELTS speaking practice test 2

IELTS speaking test 2

This section of the site is for you to try a complete IELTS speaking test. The timing of each section is automatic and follows the standard IELTS pattern. Ideally, we recommend speaking aloud when answering the questions and recording yourself, so you can play it back later and listen to your pronunciation, grammar and content.

Looking for more speaking practice opportunities? Our complete membership course has membership plans which include Skype tutorials where we can take a practice speaking assessment and give you feedback on your fluency, pronunciation and much more! Click here to enrol now.

IELTS speaking practice test 2

Part 1

“Do you often go shopping for clothes?”

Show answer“Well, I like to dress well but I don’t really enjoy going out to buy clothes. It can take such a long time to find something that I like, and then I have to go to the changing rooms to try it on and make sure it’s a good fit, and even then sometimes when I get home I find that they are not as comfortable as I thought. I much prefer to go shopping for electronic goods – I can spend hours looking at things like laptop computers or iPods.”

“Do you think it’s important to dress well?”

Show answerI think that really depends on what you intend to do that day. As I mentioned, I like to look smart, but if it’s a weekend or in the evening, it’s much more important to dress comfortably. I wear smart clothes to work, of course, and many of my colleagues wear ties or dark business dresses. Our company has a policy that on Fridays it’s OK to wear more casual clothes, so I might go into work wearing jeans but I would always wear a clean, ironed shirt – never just a t-shirt.

“Do you have particular national dress in your country?”

Show answer“Well, yes, we do. On certain days of the year, then men would wear black trousers and a white shirt, often with a thin red scarf. The women wear a black dress and a white shirt, but have a scarf that is more orange in colour. The clothing is a lot more elaborate that normal though, with a lot of embroidery and designs. Many people also have the shirts or blouses made of silk too, so they can look very striking.”

“I’d like to talk about the news now. Do you often read newspapers?”

Show answerWell, not very often. There is a free local newspaper that gets delivered every week and I have a quick look through that, but I rarely buy a newspaper. If I do, it would be one of the national papers. I sometime read The Tribune when I’m at work, in my coffee breaks, but mostly just the headlines. I don’t really have a lot of free time to sit and relax with a paper. If I do have time, I prefer to listen to music or watch television.

“Where do you go to get news?”

Show answerHmmm… a lot of the time I would just find that out when I’m surfing the internet, or sometimes I watch the news on the television. I’m more interested in local news, so I can get some information from the free local paper. I think that sometimes newspapers and the television will sometimes sensationalise the pieces that they present and very often have a bias when they are reporting events, especially if they are political. A lot of what I know about the news actually comes from talking with my colleagues at work – they seem much more informed about events than me!

“Do you listen to news broadcasts on the radio?”

Show answerNo, not really. Sometimes when I’m driving I might listen to the short news broadcasts that comes on every hour, but only because the radio is on. I wouldn’t make a special effort to tune in just for the news. The problem with the news on the radio is that it is much less informative because it doesn’t have any images to show what is happening. For instance, the recent tsunami was being described on the radio just a few days ago, and they were discussing the amount of damage caused, but it was only when I saw the images on the television that I really got a feel for the amount of destruction that had been caused.

“Let’s move on to talk about holidays. Did you often go on holiday when you were a child?”

Show answerI wouldn’t say often, as both my parents worked, but I do remember some family holidays we took together. They were always fun, even if the weather wasn’t so good. We would go to the beach with a little caravan and spend about a week there – we always went to the same place. Sometimes it would be warm enough to go swimming in the sea, but if not, we would play games as a family, or go into the town to the cinema and somewhere nice to eat. The thing I remember most is that it was when we all got to spend the most time together, and everyone had fun.

“Would you prefer to travel overseas for a holiday?”

Show answerNo, not particularly. Of course, it’s always interesting to see other places and experience other cultures, but I think you can have a perfectly good holiday in your country. I guess it also depends on whether or not you have children to think about. Taking a family of four to another country, especially if that means flying, can be very expensive and can take a day or two off your holiday just travelling. Having said that, though, I think it’s always good to be in warm country when you’re on holiday and sometimes that does mean travelling abroad.

“Do you have plans for a holiday in the future?”

Show answerYes, definitely! As soon as I have taken my IELTS test and got the results I need, I am going to France to visit by brother and his family. They moved over there a few years ago and I haven’t been yet so I am going to treat myself to a 10 day break. I’m really looking forward to it, and it’ll be nice to get away after having studied for this test for the last few months. After that holiday, though, I will be looking for a new job so probably won’t have much time off for a while, so I’m going to make the most of my trip to Paris.

“Have you ever been on a long journey?”

Show answerErr…yes, I have. I suppose my longest journey would be travelling to England to visit relatives last year. It’s a 14 hour flight from here, and it was the longest I have ever been on an aeroplane. The journey out was fine – I thought it would be quite boring, but it was one of the newer aircraft with a movies, television and computer games available, so there was lots to do. The return trip wasn’t so good though – there was a young child sitting in the row in front of me, and for most of the flight he was crying and screaming. I don’t suppose he was much older than three. So that wasn’t so good for me, although I did feel sorry for the parents – they look so tired by the time we landed!

“Do you prefer to travel alone or with other people?”

Show answerWell, there are benefits to both travelling with others and travelling solo. With other people around, the trip can be more fun, and you get to share experiences and talk about them with people that have seen and done what you have. On the other hand, I like the independence of travelling by myself. I choose when I stop, where I eat, where I go – and this is often better than having to get your travel companions to agree before you do anything. I guess the ideal way to travel would be with someone else who also likes to be independent sometimes, so you can travel together but also spend some time alone.

 

Part Two

Describe a place you’d like to live in the future
You should say:

  • Where it would be
  • What it would be like
  • Who you would live with

You should also say why you would like to live there.

Show answer“Well, I’d really like to live somewhere that has a comfortable temperature, not too hot or too cold. I think New Zealand has the perfect climate for me – although there are 4 different seasons, it can still reach temperatures of over 25 degrees in the summer, and in some places it doesn’t freeze in the winter, even overnight, so that would be good for me. I have heard that it’s also a beautiful country – I’ve seen some photographs of the national parks and they look amazing. I think they have even used the landscapes in a lot of movies like Lord of the Rings.
Of course I would take my family with me, which is another reason to think New Zealand would be a good place to live – it has a reputation of being such a safe country, so would be perfect as I have two young children who are about to start school. My wife is a nurse, and like most countries, New Zealand is also in desperate need of more people with a medical background in the workforce, so I think it would be easier for her to get a job in a hospital. In addition to everything I have already mentioned, I have also heard that New Zealand has a relatively small population – I think there are about 5 million people – and they are a very welcoming and friendly nation. In my country, most people live in the city and it is often overcrowded, so moving to a country that has some open spaces would be perfect.
I would like to live somewhere near one of the larger cities. Maybe not right in the middle of the city, but close so that it’s accessible if I need to go. But regardless of all of these positive aspects of living in New Zealand, I don’t think we would every actually move there. We have a wide circle of friends here, and our parents both live nearby, so we see them quite often. I think perhaps the ideal situation would be to live somewhere for a few months of the year, but not permanently. That wouldn’t really work for the children though, as that would interrupt their school schedule a little too much.”

 

Part 3

“What are the advantages and disadvantages of living in a rural area?”

Show answerHmmm…. There are a number of clear advantages when considering health implications. City life tends to be much more hurried, leading to greater degrees of stress and tension, so a clear advantage of living in the countryside is that people tend to live much more stress-free lives. They don’t have to contend with traffic jams, queues and the sheer number of people. There is also the environmental factor. The air quality in the city I live in is particularly bad – a combination of exhaust fumes, industrial pollution and a number of other factors. In the countryside, the environment is cleaner and this has obvious health benefits. However, there are issues about living in the countryside that I would find a problem. Shopping, for example – I like the fact that I can get almost anything I need without travelling too far, but living in more rural areas you wouldn’t have access to the array of shops you have in the city.

“Has the standard of living changed much in your country over the last ten years?”

Show answerWell, there are still significant differences between rich and poor people, with some people continuing to live well below the poverty line, but in general I think there has been a significant change. There has been an increase in tourism over recent years which has brought money into the country, and that has improved most people living conditions. There has also been a much greater focus on education, with an increasing number of children attending school, which of course will have a significantly positive effect on the standard of living here in the future. However, there has been only minimal progress with regards healthcare, so I would say the standards there haven’t really improved very much.

“Do you think more people will choose to leave their native country and live abroad in the future?”

Show answerWell, I think that a greater number of people may choose to travel to other countries, and may find a location they would prefer to live in than their home country. However, many people are not emigrating permanently, and may choose to return to their country of birth. In the future, I think that this migration is probably going to continue, but the main difference will be that travel becomes more affordable so even lower income families will have the option to relocate overseas, so the numbers will increase. Of course, it’s likely that some of the countries that are currently so heavily favoured, such as the USA or the UK, will be less popular destinations in the future, so an increasing number of people may choose to live in countries that at the moment we don’t really think about for immigration.

“Do you think students should be encouraged to study overseas? ”

Show answerThat would very much depend on their course of study. I would say that the benefits of studying science related subjects overseas are limited. Although you may get to see how other countries conduct research or experimentation, the basic rules and operating procedures in science will not vary between countries. However, I would say that there would be substantial advantages for students on courses involving people or language. For example, if studying the English language, it can be extremely beneficial to spend some time living in an English speaking country. Also, for a student studying design related subjects, it could be extremely advantageous to see other countries to absorb other perspectives and influences. Having said that, however, studying overseas should only be encouraged if it could be offered equally to all students, not just to those whose families could afford the costs.

Do you think that increased mobility has had a negative effect on communities?

Show answerHmmm…that’s not something I’ve ever really thought about, but…I suppose there are changes to local communities when people leave and new people arrive, but I wouldn’t agree that they were necessarily negative. New arrivals into a community may be able to offer new things that would definitely benefit the local people, but then there is also the lack of long term bonds that can often be a significant part of smaller communities. Living in a city, there is less of a community feeling and that does have an effect on social behaviour, I think. We have problems with vandalism and graffiti that I imagine would be much less common in a community where everyone knows each other and people are easily recognised. However, I would say that on the whole an increase in people’s ability to move to other communities is a positive thing.

 

Our Gold and Diamond membership plan includes Skype discussions where we can help you one to one to improve your speaking. Click here to find out more!

word-of-the-day

IELTS word of the day Set 1 word 9

IELTS word of the day Set 1 word 9

IELTS word of the day Set 1 word 9

WORD: abandon

WORD FAMILY: verb

MEANING: to withdraw support from, to stop trying to continue something.

EXAMPLE (verb): The fishermen had to abandon their ship and escape to safety because of the storm.

STRESS: a-BAN-don

Pronunciation (click the play button below)

Quick test. Is the use of abandon correct in these sentences?

 

1. There were difficulties in getting enough workers spare parts, so the project was abandoned.

Show answer
This is a good use of abandon.

 

2. They had to go even though he hadn’t finished, so he abandoned the last of his coffee.

Show answer
This is not correct. The most suitable word here would be ‘left’.

 

3. They abandoned the baby outside the hospital.

Show answer
This is a a good use of abandon.

 

4. He abandoned the baby at the child care centre until 4pm and went to work.

Show answer
This is not correct. To abandon means to leave completely, but ion this sentence the man is returning at 4pm.

reading-test

Free IELTS General Training Reading test 3 Section 2

Free IELTS General Training Reading test 3 Section 2

Go back to Section 1 | Section 3

This free IELTS reading test (General Training) has the same question types, content style, length and difficulty as a standard IELTS test. To get started simply scroll down to read the texts and answer the questions.

Free IELTS General Training Reading test 3 Section 2Looking for more reading practice tests? Our online course has over 15 complete practice tests as well as end of lesson tests and reading texts used in the lessons.

Important notes before you begin this section of the test:

  • There is a box beside each question for you to write your answer
  • When you have finished (or after any question) click the ‘Show answers’ link to see the answer(s) and an explanation
  • This is a General Training Section 2, which means there is either two or three short reading texts that you need to use to complete the section
  • When you have finished on this page, count the number of correct answers you have and make a note. When you have completed the full test, go to the band score converter to find out your approximate IELTS band score

Section 2

Read the text below and answer the questions that follow.

Corbridge teacher training

Welcome to the Corbridge teacher training course. Please keep this guide with you throughout the course so you know the structure of what you are studying.

Week 1
In the first week, trainees are typically introduced to different teaching methodologies and styles as modelled by your trainers. This first week requires a significant amount of reading and discussion, but at this point you will not be expected to do any teaching.

Week 2
During your second week, classroom practice begins. At this stage you will be delivering short lessons to small groups of students. You will not be required to plan the lessons at this point, but you will be observed by your peers. You will also be expected to hand in your first draft of assignment 1 – a lesson plan (at this point you will still be permitted to use published resources).

Week 3
At this point comes an intensive study into grammar; although you may know which tenses and voice to use for each situation, you need to develop the ability to actually impart this information in a coherent and learnable manner. For many trainees, it can come as a surprise to find that they actually had no clear understanding of the mechanics of their own language, and this can be as difficult to learn as it is for non-native speakers! You will also be presenting to larger groups of students and will be formally marked on your classroom performance. The first assignment needs to be handed in to your teacher trainers.

Week 4
You will deliver five lessons to varying group sizes, ages and on different aspects of the language; each lesson will be monitored and your final grade based on how you are assessed.  You will also be required to hand in your second assignment. Remember that, unlike the first assignment, this assignment must be computer typed.

NOTE: Towards the end of the course, the numbers of lessons trainees have to deliver increases, as does the criticism of their performance. There is a high dropout rate from the third week as many people find the pressure of being assessed by their mentors and their peers too much to handle, and the rate at which trainees leave increases in the following week. If you are feeling under pressure it is important to talk to your teacher trainer immediately.

Questions 15-20

For which rules are the following statements true? Write the correct letter A-D in boxes 15 – 17 on your answer sheet.
NB You may use any letter more than once.

  • A. Week #1
  • B. Week #2
  • C. Week #3
  • D. Week #4

15. The first assignment must be completed.
Show answer

C (week 3) – “The first assignment needs to be handed in to your teacher trainers” (in Week 2 a draft needs to be submitted)

16. The first assessed teaching is done.
Show answer

C (week 3) – “You will also be presenting to larger groups of students and will be formally marked on your classroom performance”

17. Different ways of teaching are demonstrated.
Show answer

A (week 1) – “different teaching methodologies and styles”

Look at the statements below. In boxes 24 – 26 on your answer sheet write,

  • TRUE if the statement agrees with the information
  • FALSE if the statement contradicts the information
  • NOT GIVEN if there is no information on this

18. Assignment 1 can be hand written.
Show answer

True – “Remember that, unlike the first assignment, this assignment must be computer typed”.

19. The grammar training is easy for native speakers.
Show answer

False – “For many trainees, it can come as a surprise to find that they actually had no clear understanding of the mechanics of their own language, and this can be as difficult to learn as it is for non-native speakers!”

20. The fourth week has the most trainees quitting the course.
Show answer

True – “There is a high dropout rate from the third week …and the rate at which trainees leave increases in the following week”.

 

Questions 21-26 relate to the reading passage below.

Read the text and answer the questions that follow.

To all staff

Starting the 3rd of next month, there will be a number training sessions for all staff. Attendance at the first and second session is compulsory, as well as one additional session which you may choose from the remaining options.  Please note that seating may be limited so you should arrange with your supervisor which of the sessions you would like to attend.

Session 1: Dealing with complaints. Ms Weldgrove will be facilitating this session aimed at making sure that all staff are aware of current office policy regarding complaints.  There have been some incidents recently that have not been handled effectively so this session will focus on appropriate procedures when dealing with complaints. As this is a compulsory session, attendance will be high so we will be using the main conference room on the third floor.

Session 2: Company image. As you should all be aware, the company is changing its image and branding colours, and this is expected to be completed within the next month. This will require a number of changes to the logo, stationery and uniforms for front-of-house staff. Business cards will be changed, although this is expected to take a little longer. Mark Lorins has organised and will run this training session, focusing on what is expected from your during the changeover period. This will also be held in the conference room on the third floor

Session 3: Word processing suite. Gordon Sumner will be offering training in the new word processing software that is being installed in all departments over the next few weeks. There will also be a guest speaker from MacroSwift to introduce the new Visual Presentation software. The session will be in the computer room; there are 70 places available for this seminar so it is recommended you confirm attendance as soon as possible to avoid disappointment.

Session 4: Internal communication systems. This is more of a refresher course, in that Jane Williams will be running through policies and procedures for internal messaging that you should already be familiar with. She will be joined by Ruth Madocs from the HR department. Due to space requirements, this session will be held in the conference room in the Logan Hotel.

Questions 21-23

Choose the correct letter A, B, C or D.

Write your answers in boxes 21-23 on your answer sheet.

21. Staff…

  • A. must attend all sessions.
  • B. must attend only the first and second session.
  • C. do not have to attend if they make arrangements with their supervisor.
  • D. must attend 3 sessions.


Show answer

D – “Attendance at the first and second session is compulsory, as well as one additional session”

 

22. The first session…

  • A.is about how to make a complaint.
  • B. has been arranged because of previous problems.
  • C. will be held outside the company.
  • D. is likely to have few attendees.


Show answer

B – “There have been some incidents recently that have not been handled effectively so this session will focus on appropriate procedures when dealing with complaints.”

 

23. The third session…

  • A. is the only one to have two facilitators
  • B. will have 2 speakers from another company
  • C. is already fully booked
  • D. has limited seating


Show answer

 D – “there are 70 places available for this seminar”

Questions 24-26

Answer the questions below using NO MORE THAN THREE WORDS OR A NUMBER from the passage for each answer.

Write your answers in boxes 24-26 on your answer sheet.

24. Which session will not be held in the company? 
Show answer

Session 4: “this session will be held in the conference room in the Logan Hotel.”

25. Which session will have two facilitators from within the company? 
Show answer

Session 4: “Jane Williams … joined by Ruth Madocs from the HR department” (session 3 has a facilitator from another company)

26. Which session is to prepare staff for future changes? 
Show answer

Session 2: “… changing its image and branding colours, and this is expected to be completed within the next month”

27. Which session is to discuss recent problems? 
Show answer

Session 1: “Dealing with complaints…. There have been some incidents recently that have not been handled effectively”

Show All correct answers


 

You have now completed Section 2. Take a note of the number of correct answers, then move on to Section 3.

ielts-task-2-writng-model-answer

IELTS Task 2 Writing model answer 025

IELTS Task 2 Writing model answer 25

All of the model answers on this site are guaranteed band 9

You should spend about 40 minutes on this task.

Write about the following topic:

Should arts-related entertainment venues such as museums and art galleries be free of charge for the general public, or should a charge apply for admittance?

Discuss this issue, and give your opinion.

Give reasons for your answer and include any relevant examples from your own knowledge or experience.

Write at least 250 words.

 

IELTS Task 2 Writing model answer 25

There is a strong argument to be made for charging an entry fee to public venues dedicated to the arts, but there is also a case in favour of making them free, as will now be discussed.

Primarily, the decision to charge for certain forms of entertainment yet offer others without cost to the visitor requires a degree of subjective judgement about their worth. For some, a museum is far more important than a trip to the cinema, yet it could be argued that they are equally deserving forms of artistic entertainment.

In addition, there are far more deserving areas that are in desperate need of funding, such as healthcare. The cultural importance of looking at art simply does not equate with the importance of ensuring that citizens are healthy. In many countries, a visit to a museum is free, yet the cost of a university education is prohibitive.

Yet these points must be balanced with the understanding that unlike other forms of entertainment, the number of people visiting museums who would be willing to pay a significant entry fee is low. Given the choice of a museum trip or surfing the internet, the majority of people in recent generations would likely opt for the latter, meaning that the galleries would be forced to close if they were not funded.

To conclude, although there would be clear benefits to charging a fee for entry to such artistic venues, it is unlikely that one would be levied as this would almost certainly result in their closure. The best course of action at this point would be entry by donation, rather than a fixed fee.

 

(268 words)

reading-test

Free IELTS General Training Reading test 3 Section 1

Free IELTS General Training Reading test 3 Section 1

Section 1

Section 2 | Section 3

This free IELTS reading test (General Training) has the same question types, content style, length and difficulty as a standard IELTS test. To get started simply scroll down to read the texts and answer the questions.

Free IELTS General Training Reading test 3 Section 1Looking for more reading practice tests? Our online course has over 15 complete practice tests as well as end of lesson tests and reading texts used in the lessons.

When you have finished the test, click the ‘Finish quiz’ button. To see which of your answers were marked as correct or incorrect, click the ‘View questions’ button. When completed, move on to Section 2.

Section 1:


 

Dear Householder,

Request for unwanted but useful items for school jumble sale

As part of this year’s fund-raising event, Edgehill College will be holding a jumble sale on May 24th. All profits will be used to assist in funding of the new children’s play ground in the centre of town.

We are now requesting donations of unwanted but useful items of usable quality to sell on our jumble sale stalls. We would much appreciate donations in any of the following categories:

  • Clothes – Please place washed items in bags or boxes and mark them ‘For Men’, ‘For Women’ or ‘For Children’
  • Kitchenware – any items are of use (e.g. plates, cups, glasses, cooking utensils, kitchen equipment such as food mixers etc), currently in short supply.
  • Books– complete books (no missing pages), we are especially looking for children’s novels.
  • Miscellaneous – Ornaments, pictures, toys, games, handbags etc. Please place in boxes and write the names of the items inside clearly on the box.

We will also be collecting food which will be donated to the local homeless shelter. If you wish to make a food donation please provide tinned, dried or packet foodstuffs only.  Please do not donate food items that are likely to spoil.

If you are able to, please bring your donated items to the school reception (Monday to Friday between 9.30am and 3.00pm).  Otherwise, for larger loads, if you are unable to get to school, we can arrange for a member of the team to collect your items. Please ring 762 8894 and ask to speak to Mr William Taylor our School Liaison Officer who will arrange for one of our volunteer parents to pick up your donation.

On a final note, we are also still looking for additional volunteers to take care of stalls on the day of the jumble sale.  The event will take place between 9.30am and 2pm. If you are free on that day and willing to help out, please contact the Deputy Headmistress Mrs Jayne Browne on 762 8889.

Thank you in advance for your help and support. We look forward to seeing you on May 24th.

Best wishes
Karl Blackman
Headmaster


Questions 1-14

Read the information below and answer Questions 1-4

Match the pictures below to the appropriate statement. Write the correct letter A-D in boxes 1 – 4 on your answer sheet.

A. Should only be packaged in boxes.
B. The school does not have many of these items to sell at the moment.
C. Should be labelled in one of three ways.
D. The school wants more of these which would be suitable for youngsters.

IELTS General Training reading test

1.
Show answer

B – ‘Miscellaneous – Ornaments, pictures, toys, games, handbags etc. Please place in boxes and write the names of the items inside clearly on the box.’

2.
Show answer

C – Kitchenware – any items are of use (e.g. plates, cups, glasses, cooking utensils, kitchen equipment such as food mixers etc), currently in short supply.

3.
Show answer

D – Clothes – Please place washed items in bags or boxes and mark them‘For Men’, ‘For Women’ or ‘For Children’

4.
Show answer

A – ‘Books– complete books (no missing pages), we are especially looking for children’s novels.’

 

Questions 5-9

Look at the statements below. In boxes 5 – 9 on your answer sheet write,

TRUE if the statement agrees with the information

FALSE if the statement contradicts the information

NOT GIVEN if there is no information on this

5. The event is being held to raise money for school facilities.
Show answer

FALSE – ‘All profits will be used to assist in funding of the new children’s play ground in the centre of town. ‘

6. The school is collecting fresh fruit and vegetables to donate to a homeless shelter.
Show answer

FALSE – ‘If you wish to make a food donation please provide tinned, dried or packet foodstuffs only. Please do not donate food items that are likely to spoil.’

7. Items will be picked up by volunteers between 9.30am and 3pm.
Show answer

NOT GIVEN – ‘If you are able to, please bring your donated items to the school reception (Monday to Friday between 9.30am and 3.00pm).Otherwise, for larger loads, if you are unable to get to school, we can arrange for a member of the team to collect your items.’ – The text does not say when the items will be collected, only when they can be taken to school.

8. Mr William Taylor will make arrangements for items to be collected.
Show answer

TRUE – ‘Please ring 762 8894 and ask to speak to Mr William Taylor our School Liaison Officer who will arrange for one of our volunteer parents to pick up your donation.’

9. All helpers for the event are now confirmed.
Show answer

FALSE – ‘On a final note, we are also still looking for additional volunteers to take care of stalls on the day of the jumble sale. ‘

 


Examples of Books Available at Edgehill School Jumble Sale!

  1. A delightful children’s story suitable for those who have recently started to learn to read. The tale and illustrations follow the story of the heroic Sam and the friends he meets on his travels across Europe. Great fun for parents and children to enjoy together.
  2. A must for any art appreciator.  Informative historical accounts and full page illustrations based upon acclaimed Masters from France, Italy and Germany during the 19th and 20th Century.
  3. Young and enquiring minds will adore this book. Over 500 pages of information ranging from the field of science to history, geography and art. This special addition also includes end of chapter quizzes to check understanding.  A superb learning tool!
  4. Lovers of hiking and the great outdoors will appreciate this! It has lots of information on lesser known tracks for those wishing to escape the more usual paths and trails used by the masses. Enjoy this picturesque part of the country in solitude.
  5. A useful handbook for lovers of the great outdoors.  Informative regarding tips for lighting campfires, setting up and cooking. An up to date list of various places to stay throughout the country.
  6. An academic appreciation and comparison of inspiration in the past.  Exploration of art work in Egyptian and Greek culture and its significance in evolution of creativity.
  7. Stimulate your children’s natural curiosity and artistic flair – a wide range of subject matters are covered, from bird and wildlife – easy to follow steps from creative models and drawings to Plaster of Paris modeling and origami.

The list of book titles has seven story descriptions A-G. Choose the correct title for each book from the list of titles below. Write the correct number i-ix in boxes 10 – 14 on your answer sheet.

List of Book Titles
  1. A Guide to Walks in the Peak District
  2. The Children’s Guide to Bird-watching
  3. European Art
  4. Get the Most out of Camping
  5. Ancient Art
  6. The Children’s Encyclopedia
  7. Creative Pastimes for Children
  8. Mystical Egypt
  9. The Adventures of Sammy Swan


EXAMPLE Book A ix

10. Book B
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iii – ‘A must for any art appreciator. Informative historical accounts and full page illustrations based upon acclaimed Masters from France, Italy and Germany during the 19th and 20th Century.

11. Book C
Show answer

vi – ‘Young and enquiring minds will adore this book. Over 500 pages of information ranging from the field of science to history, geography and art. This special addition also includes end of chapter quizzes to check understanding. A superb learning tool!’

12. Book D
Show answer

i – ‘Lovers of hiking and the great outdoors will appreciate this! It has lots of information on lesser known tracks for those wishing to escape the more usual paths and trails used by the masses. Enjoy this picturesque part of the country in solitude. ‘
EXAMPLE Book E iv

13. Book F
Show answer

v – ‘An academic appreciation and comparison of inspiration in the past. Exploration of art work in Egyptian and Greek culture and its significance in evolution of creativity.’

14. Book G
Show answer

vii – ‘Stimulate your children’s natural curiosity and artistic flair – a wide range of subject matters are covered, from bird and wildlife – easy to follow steps from creative models and drawings to Plaster of Paris modeling and origami.

Show All correct answers

You have now completed Section 1. Take a note of the number of correct answers, then move on to Section 2.

word-of-the-day

IELTS word of the day Set 1 word 8

IELTS word of the day Set 1 word 8

IELTS word of the day Set 1 word 8

WORD: lack

WORD FAMILY: verb and noun

MEANING: not have something that is considered desirable or needed

EXAMPLE (verb): Many elderly people lack the ability to surf the internet.

EXAMPLE (noun): There is a lack of facilities in many inner city schools.

STRESS: LACK

Pronunciation (click the play button below)

Quick test. Are the sentences below using LACK as a verb or a noun?

 

1. The lack of support meant that the client eventually took their business elsewhere.

Show answer
This is a noun

 

2. Many countries lack the basic essentials of life, like clean water and good health care.

Show answer
This is a verb

 

3. He didn’t get a high score in his IELTS test because he lacked motivation in the weeks before the test.

Show answer
This is a verb

 

4. He didn’t get a high score in his IELTS test because of a lack of motivation in the weeks before the test.

Show answer
This is a noun

task-1-model-answer

IELTS General Training Task 1 Writing model answer 019

IELTS General Training Task 1 Writing model answer 19

IELTS General Training Task 1 Writing model answer 19You should spend about 20 minutes on this task.

A family member is coming to stay with you. He/she will be arriving by train in the morning, but you won’t be home until the evening.

Write a letter to your relative. In your letter:

  • explain arrangements you have made for them to have keys and get into the house
  • tell your relative how to get from the train station to your house
  • say when you will be home and suggest what you could do together that evening

You do NOT need to write any addresses.

Begin your letter as follows:

Dear…

Write at least 150 words.


Dear Uncle John,

I am so excited that you’ll soon be here! I’m sorry that I won’t be there to meet you at the station – I have a work meeting I really have to go to but I’ve left the keys with David. Just go and see him so you can let yourself in. I’m sure you remember, but he’s the man living at number 21. Make yourself at home – there will be food in the fridge and your bed will be made.

The easiest way to get to the house is to jump in a taxi –it’s not expensive and the buses are so unreliable! I was thinking that when I get back we could perhaps go out for dinner? I’ll be back no later than six, so we could go to that restaurant we went to last time you came.

Well, I think that’s everything. It’s going to be great catching up!

Safe trip,

Patrick

 

(155 words)