Category Archives: IELTS Reading (all)

Free IELTS Academic Reading test 5 Section 2

Free IELTS Academic Reading test 5 Section 2

Go back to Section 1 | Go to Section 3

This free IELTS reading test (Academic Module) has the same question types, content style, length and difficulty as a standard IELTS test. To get started simply scroll down to read the texts and answer the questions.

Free IELTS Academic Reading test 5 Section 2Looking for more reading practice tests? Our online course has over 15 complete practice tests as well as end of lesson tests and reading texts used in the lessons.

When you have finished the test, make a note of the number of correct answers and move on to Section 3.

Section 2:


You should spend about 20 minutes on Questions 16 – 27, which are based on Reading Passage 2 below.

Migration – the incredible journey

Twice a year, certain species of birds make immense journeys, often in excess of ten thousand miles, spending the summer months in a temperate climate and the rest of the year in more tropical climates. This migration is a long journey which many birds do not complete, yet it is an essential part of their natural pattern.

Many reasons can be given for this migration. Some argue that it is a result of some birds being unable to withstand extremes of temperature, especially the cold weather, explaining why many birds migrate to Africa during the European winter. It has also been suggested that this migration is a result of travelling instincts of millennia ago, before the continents drifted apart. As the land mass spread, birds continued to travel the required distance back to the area they knew was a good source of food or protection. The primary cause, however, is considered to be the search for food, particularly for their chicks. Staying in one place, the food sources would become increasingly scarce.

In preparation for their long journey, migratory birds undergo a number of physical and chemical changes. These changes are triggered by the rising or falling daylight and result in a considerable increase in the birds’ appetite (up to 40% more than during other times of the year). This food is stored in fat deposits and in some long-distance migrants, this fat becomes 30–50% of their weight, ready to be released gradually to fuel their journey. In addition, they are also considerably more active at night, influenced by chemical changes preparing them for their long-distance haul. Most birds travel long distances overnight, partly as migratory flight generates considerable heat that needs night-time temperatures to dissipate.

The speed at which migratory birds travel varies depending on species. Some birds can reach speeds of nearly 90 kilometres an hour, while others travel at a more sedate pace. Ducks and geese can fly between 60 and 80 kilometres an hour where herons and hawks travel at less than 40 kilometres an hour. Many smaller birds are capable of travelling at considerably faster speeds for short periods in order to escape predators, but cannot maintain these speeds for the distances required for migration. Another difference between species is that for some, the males migrate first, arriving at the breeding grounds early in order to establish territories before the female arrives to choose a suitable site for a nest.

One of the most impressive aspects of this migration is how birds can maintain a direction. Most migrating birds return to the same nesting areas year after year. Theories to explain precision of travelling such distances without getting lost have considered landmarks on the Earth’s surface, the sun and the stars, even wind direction and an acute sense of smell. Yet these theories do not explain how some birds can travel thousands of miles on windy and wet nights and still arrive in the same area year after year.

Naturally, given the dangers involved, migration is a dangerous journey. Untold thousands of smaller migrants die each year from storms and attacks by predators. Mortality during migratory flight, of course, is one of the several costs that are covered by the increased production of offspring that migrants obtain by nesting in locations where food is more abundant and competition for most resources is lower. Flying at night, lighthouses, tall buildings, monuments, television towers, and other aerial obstructions have been responsible for destruction of migratory birds who simply do not detect the problem before it is too late. There is also the simple matter of exhaustion, particularly for smaller birds with less energy reserves. Birds flying for up to 48 hours straight can run into adverse winds and find the last of their energy depleted before they reach land. Flying lower and lower as fatigue sets in, these birds fall into the sea.

The most recent challenge to migration is, however, man. Slow climatic and environmental changes have always occurred, but not on the grand scale people have been responsible for. Extensive forests have been burned or cut away, and open fields have been claimed for agricultural purposes. Urban expansion has further encroached on the birds’ natural habitats, and pollution, particularly in the form of acid rain, has damaged many of the remaining fields, mountains, lakes and forests. Wetlands that were once home to many species of birds are increasingly drained or filled as land is needed for new housing developments. After overcoming all the trials and risks involved in migration, many birds find that their homes of the year before are now unrecognisable and they are forced to find new grounds on which to breed, often straying into areas defended by larger and aggressively territorial birds.


Questions 16 – 27

Questions 16 – 18

Choose the correct answer A–D.

16. The main reason birds migrate is

a. the demands of their new-born
b. to avoid cold weather
c. because of an instinctive homing impulse
d. because of a scarcity of food.
Show answer A (‘D’ is incorrect as the text states ‘food…would become increasingly scarce’)

 

17. Birds prepare for migration by

a. gradually burning fat deposits
b. shedding up to 50% of their body weight
c. becoming more nocturnal
d. travelling long distances.
Show answer C

18. Birds that die during migration

a. often drown
b. balance the number of new-born birds
c. are generally old
d. waited too long to begin their journey.
Show answer B


Questions 19- 23

Do the following statements agree with the views of the writer?

Write

YES if the statement agrees with the writer
NO if the statement does not agree with the writer
NOT GIVEN if the information is not given in the passage.

  1. Migratory habits vary between species.
    Show answer Yes
  2. There are a number of complete theories to explain the navigational abilities of migrating birds.
    Show answer No
  3. The female of the species often flies slower than the male.
    Show answer Not given
  4. Smaller birds are at greater risk than bigger birds.
    Show answer Yes
  5. People’s relationship with the land is the biggest danger for migrating birds.
    Show answer Not given (‘The most recent challenge’ is not necessarily the biggest danger)

Questions 24 – 27

Complete the following summary using NO MORE THAN TWO WORDS FROM THE TEXT.

Not only are cities becoming larger, new housing is being built on areas reclaimed from (24) . In addition, migrating birds are also at risk from a number of different (25) which cannot be seen in the dark. Smaller birds are particularly vulnerable as they are at risk from (26) and (27) .

24. Show answer Wetlands 25. Show answer Aerial obstructions 26. Show answer Predators OR storms 27. Show answer Predators OR storms

Show All correct answers

Once you have finished, check your answers, then move on to Section 3

Reading for meaning in IELTS

Reading for meaning in IELTS

This practice exercises follows on from the information in this lesson about understanding meaning in IELTS reading. You should read that lesson before starting this exercise!

Challenge yourself! In the time I have used this exercise with my classes, less than 5% of students scored 100% – see what score you can get!

Read the text below and complete the task that follows.

Reading for meaning in IELTSAttention deficit hyperactivity disorder, or ADHD as it is more commonly referred to, is often erroneously considered to be a relatively modern ailment. In fact, it was first diagnosed as far back as 1845 by Dr Heinrich Hoffman, although it was not until the turn of the century that ADHD was given medical credence as Dr G. F. Still presented a paper to the Royal College of Physicians in England. Since that date, many scientists, doctors and psychologists have vastly increased the fund of information available, slowly reversing the impression that children with ADHD are simply badly brought up. It is now commonly understood that although most children have little difficulty in concentrating on a subject, for those with ADHD, attention spans are short.

However, Robert Ashcroft, Headmaster of Oreno College, is sceptical, referring to such diagnoses as a pseudo-science. The situation, claims Ashcroft, has spawned from a modern trend towards scientifically categorising our actions, and is simply another argument in a fundamentally flawed society that does not wish to take responsibility for its behaviour.

Karen Waters is vocal in her opposition to Ashcroft and his supporters. Working with the Mental Health Board, Waters is concerned that until ADHD is officially recognised, it will continue to be misdiagnosed and sufferers will not get the help and support they need. It would appear that the tide is turning in her favour, as all but a few schools around the country have on their staff professionals trained to recognise the signs, but Waters feels this is not yet enough. Awareness of the condition, she claims, needs to be in all levels of society, not just in schools.

Although few would argue that the symptoms of ADHD can be problematic at times, not everyone sees ADHD as a negative thing. It has been argued that where traditional thinking sees lack of attention, others see boredom and a thirst for action. Those with ADHD are considered to be more creative, more likely to take risks, both physical and academic, so long as there is stimulation in it. The term ‘attention deficit’ is misleading, as what we are really seeing is attention inconsistency. These people have a high level of energy and, if they can find a place in the business community, can work tirelessly and brainstorm with much greater ease than so-called ‘normal’ people. They are intuitive and can work at problems from a different perspective, offering a flexibility that is a positive attribute in business. It is not them, argues Waters, but society itself that is disordered. With such stalwart champions, it is not beyond possibility that those with ADHD will find the support and understanding that their condition requires.


 

Are the following statements TRUE, FALSE OR NOT GIVEN according to the article? Find evidence for your answer if possible.

1. ADHD is not a new condition.
Show answer TRUE (erroneously considered…modern ailment)

2. It was first identified in a paper presented to the Royal College of Physicians.
Show answer FALSE (diagnosed 1845…Heinrich Hoffman)

3. Ashcroft does not believe in ADHD.
Show answer TRUE (sceptical…pseudo-science)

4. Ashcroft blames families for the situation.
Show answer NOT GIVEN

5. Waters believes ADHD is too easily mistaken for other problems.
Show answer TRUE (misdiagnosed)

6. Not many schools have people available to help.
Show answer FALSE (all but a few schools have…professionals)

7. Most people do not see the negative side of ADHD.
Show answer FALSE (few would argue…problematic at times)

8. The term given to the condition is inaccurate.
Show answer TRUE (term…is misleading)

9. An increasing number of ADHD sufferers are being employed in business.
Show answer NOT GIVEN

10. There is a chance ADHD sufferers will be better understood in the future.
Show answer TRUE (not beyond possibility…find the support and understanding)

 

True, False, Not Given in IELTS reading – exercise

True, False, Not Given in IELTS reading – exercise

This post is another practice exercise for True, False, Not Given style questions. For the main lesson page on this question type, take a look here: True, False, Not Given in IELTS reading

Ta moko

True, False, Not Given in IELTS reading - exerciseThe practice of making markings on the human body has long been in existence. These days, it is commonly expressed by the wearing of tattoos or piercings, and is symbolic only of a personal attitude. Yet for Maori, traditionally markings on the body, called moko, have a much deeper, symbolic relevance.

Although parallels can be seen between moko and tattooing, there are a number of fundamental differences. Perhaps the most striking is that while tattoos involve the use of needles to inject ink beneath the surface of the skin, moko designs were traditionally chiselled into the skin. A painful procedure, the ink was carved into the body of the wearer by using fine chisels and a mallet.

Another contrast to the tattooing more common today is that each marking had a message which could be read by those familiar with the process. Moko told of the wearer’s family and his tribe, illustrating who was a chief or other member of Maori aristocracy, and such clear markings meant that disputes over birthrights and status were avoidable. Moko spoke of social position within the tribe, and thus they were a dynamic form of marking; as tribe members grew, so too did the number and positioning of the moko. Women were tattooed on the chin once they had come of age, meaning that they were now entitled to speak at meetings. Markings under the nose represented childbirth, the first breath of the young. A moko design on the leg represented speed, on the arm showed occupation. For men, facial moko told a history of battles, injuries and victories, and it is these images that were the first to reach Europe. With wide eyes, open mouth and full facial moko, the Maori warriors were certainly feared by these early settlers.

In recent years, the moko has become synonymous with gang culture, as highlighted in a number of New Zealand-produced movies, yet at the same time has now reached international recognition, with pop stars and other celebrities adopting the designs. This is not a situation which pleases everyone. With so much cultural and historical significance, most Maori are rightfully protective of moko and its various designs. This possibly stems from a fear that Pakeha (the Maori name for the settlers) did not understand the significance of moko. For Maori, it was something which had to be earned, that represented an achievement. Moko were not given to everyone, and permission had to be sought from Maori elders. This was often a long, involved process of discussion because, of course, once applied, the moko could not then be withdrawn. Then, too, the early history of the settlers must be considered. For many Pakeha, it was simply a nice design, a decoration for which settlers used to pay in weapons and ammunitions. They would encourage tribes to fight and return with moko heads for display in European museums, and from this beginning it is easy to understand Maori reluctance to see moko ‘Westernised’.

Are the following statements TRUE, FALSE or NOT GIVEN according to the text?

Moko has an equal significance to tattooing.
Show answer FALSE

Chisels are used in the moko process because it can create fine lines.
Show answer NOT GIVEN

Not only the design but the placement of moko had relevance.
Show answer TRUE

Children were forbidden from wearing moko.
Show answer NOT GIVEN

Warriors wore moko to frighten their enemies.
Show answer NOT GIVEN

Europeans are not allowed to wear moko designs.
Show answer FALSE

Modern moko is only worn by gang members.
Show answer FALSE

Traditionally, moko application involved a process of consultation and discussion.
Show answer TRUE

Pakeha traditionally did not appreciate the significance of the designs.
Show answer TRUE – ‘For many Pakeha, it was simply a nice design

Heads with moko designs were traded.
Show answer TRUE

Show All correct answers

Short answer questions in the IELTS reading test

Short answer questions in the IELTS reading test

In the IELTS reading test, you may be required to answer short answer questions, where you have to write one, two or three words or a number as an answer.

As with all question types, make sure you read the question instructions carefully before you answer. Do not write more than the number of words / numbers the question asks for. Generally the instructions and limits on word numbers are written in CAPITAL LETTERS, with bold and italic script.

For example: Answer the following questions USING NO MORE THAN TWO WORDS.

If you write three words for the answer here, your answer will be marked as wrong even if you have included the two words that are correct. However, it is OK to use only one word.

Here are some common instructions for this type of question:

Answer the following questions USING NO MORE THAN TWO WORDS

This means the answers will be either one or two words.

Answer the following questions USING NO MORE THAN TWO WORDS OR A NUMBER

This means that at least one of the answers will be just a number – a useful tip!

Answer the following questions USING NO MORE THAN TWO WORDS AND / OR A NUMBER

This means that at least one of the answers will include a number and probably another word as well

Answer the following questions USING NO MORE THAN ONE WORD

This means that all of the answers are single words only

IELTS Short answer questions reading text

Now practice by reading the text below answering the 10 short answer questions that follow.


 

Thermal tourism

Short answer questions in the IELTS reading testThe heat in the middle of the earth is held in place by large plates that float over molten rock. At the point where these tectonic plates meet, there is a fissure through which the heat and power beneath the earth can escape, causing volcanic eruptions of liquid rock. However, there are some advantages to living close to the edge of tectonic plates.

New Zealand, being positioned on the border of two such tectonic plates, experiences a large amount of this geothermal activity, but it is more in the nature of thermally heated water than molten rock. From a tourism perspective, this has given the country the opportunity to develop a number of spas and hot pool resorts, some of the most well known being situated in and around Rotorua and Taupo.

Rotorua has earned the nickname of ‘RotoVegas’, in that not unlike Las Vegas it attracts a large number of international tourists every year. The majority of commercially operated tours of the North Island include a day or more in Rotorua, and very few independent travellers miss the chance to visit. From Auckland, the entry point for most visitors to the North Island, Rotorua is an idyllic car ride or bus journey through lush countryside. In addition to the numerous spas and pools, Rotorua is also a popular destination as it is a renowned centre for Maori culture. You can spend the morning walking around the area, the afternoon soaking in a hot pool and then in the evening go to a Maori concert or have a hangi, a traditional form of Maori cooking.

To name just a few of the thermal resorts in Rotorua, tourists are able to visit Hell’s Gate, Wai Ora spa, the Lakeside Thermal Holiday Park, QE Health Spa and Lady Knox geyser. At Hell’s Gate and Wai Ora, visitors can take advantage of the opportunity to bathe in geothermal mud and sulphurous water, although many people find Hell’s Gate a little less accessible. The Lakeside Holiday Park, situated on the shores of Lake Rotorua, serves breakfast cooked in thermal steam and visitors are invited to sample the medicinal benefits of soaking in pure, hot mineral pools. At the QE Health Spa, guests can luxuriate in a mineral water pressure spray massage. Lady Knox, one of New Zealand’s most famous geysers, is one of the few geysers that you can guarantee will erupt. It is stimulated artificially as it was when it was first discovered, although these days the effect is intentional. The geyser was first discovered by convicts who used the hot water around the geyser to wash their clothes, only to find that by adding soap to the water, they triggered a chemical reaction which caused the geyser to erupt.

A scenic drive to the town of Taupo offers tourists the opportunity to visit the largest lake in New Zealand. Around the lake, which bears the same name as the town, there is an abundance of cafés, restaurants and curio shops. In both Rotorua and Taupo, accommodation is plentiful and there is an option for every budget, from campsites to five-star hotels. It is also possible to rent a bach (a holiday home), offering more independence and privacy at a reasonable price. This is the preferred option for larger groups. On the shores of Lake Taupo to the northeast there is an area of the lake which has become known as ‘Hot Water Beach’, as a natural stream of thermally heated water feeds into the lake. Even on the coldest days, this area offers the chance for a warm swim.

But it is not just the main centres of attraction that benefit from thermal activity. There is another Hot Water Beach on the Coromandel Peninsula, a couple of hours’ drive from Auckland, where visitors can rent a spade to dig holes on the beach which then naturally fill with hot water. There is also the Miranda Springs resort, a relatively small leisure park only 45 minutes drive from Auckland. And, of course, this is in the North Island alone. In the South Island there is Hanmer Springs Thermal Reserve, situated in the north Canterbury region, about 90 minutes from Christchurch. Hanmer is an alpine town and the Thermal Reserve has been in operation since 1859. The resort’s proximity to Christchurch also ensures that activities and excursions are available all year round. So wherever and whenever you go, you can always find some thermal tourist attraction.

Read the text and answer the questions that follow using NO MORE THAN THREE WORDS.

How does the text refer to tourists that follow their own itineraries?
Show answer Independent travellers

What does Rotorua attract to have earned parallels with an American city?
Show answer International tourists

Where do most people first arrive when travelling in the North Island?
Show answer Auckland

What else is Rotorua noted for?
Show answer Maori culture

Where is the most convenient place to have a mud bath?
Show answer Wai Ora

What is used to start the Lady Knox geyser?
Show answer Soap

What is the name of New Zealand’s largest lake?
Show answer (Lake) Taupo

What kind of accommodation is preferred by large parties of visitors?
Show answer (A) bach

Where in Taupo can you swim all year round?
Show answer Hot Water Beach

Which city is the Thermal Reserve near?
Show answer Christchurch

Show All correct answers

Dealing with unknown vocabulary in IELTS – exercise

Dealing with unknown vocabulary in IELTS – exercise

NOTE: We recommend you read the lesson Dealing with unknown vocabulary before trying this exercise.

Now read the text below and guess what the missing word could be using the skills from the unknown vocabulary lesson. If you have an answer that we haven’t listed, post it in the comments sections below and we’ll review it to see if we should add it to the list!

Dealing with unknown vocabulary in IELTS - exerciseEvery nation has a sport to represent it. In the UK there is football and in the US they follow baseball. In New Zealand, the majority of New Zealanders follow rugby. The All Blacks, New Zealand’s national team, have gained international (Example) respect/prestige for their skill and strength. While most people, regardless of their sporting preference or nationality, have some passing knowledge of the All Blacks, fewer can claim to know the (1) of the name.Show answerPossible word here is origins, origin or history. As is true of most legends, there is more than one theory as to how the team was named, although one indisputable fact is that the New Zealand rugby team was first named The Originals in 1905. An Originals team member, Billy Wallace, held that the name ‘All Blacks’ was derived from a report on how the team played, and this theory is supported by a newspaper  (2). Show answerPossible word here is article, piece or report. that commented that the when they toured England, the team played as though they were ‘all backs’. Others claim that the name came into common use because of the team’s kit; the pitch black colour still worn by the team today. Indeed, the only (3) Show answerPossible word here is alteration, modification, difference or change. to the kit in the last century is the addition of the Silver Fern, an iconic symbol for the country and one which has been adopted by a number of New Zealand sporting teams. The silver fern itself was used by Maori as it has a reflective underside; turning this over allowed the moonlight to reflect on it, thus creating markers to guide their way back to camp.

Names aside, the All Blacks have become an international legend not only for their prowess during the game but also for their pre-match performance of the haka. Originally a Maori war dance, the haka is an entertaining, and – at least for their  (4) Show answerPossible word here is opposition, competition, competitors or rivals. – intimidating display of the All Blacks’ strength.

For the (5), Show answerPossible word here is uninitiated, layman or uninformed. it needs to be clarified that there are of course two types of rugby, each with a number of significant differences. The rugby played by the All Blacks is Rugby Union, as opposed to Rugby League the national team of which is The Kiwis (formerly the All Golds). Despite New Zealand’s size and population, in addition to what, on a global scale, is a limited amount of financial support, the All Blacks are the most (6) Show answerPossible word here is successful (we know it refers to their success because of the sentences that follow – ‘A number of international teams have still to beat them’). International Rugby Union team of all time. A number of international teams have still to beat them, and no other international team has achieved more (7) Show answerPossible word here is victories or wins (we know this because it balances the word ‘losses’ at the end of the sentence). than losses against them.

The origins of the game itself, as with the name ‘All Blacks’, are uncertain. William Webb Ellis, born in 1823 and a former student of Rugby school in England, is credited by many as having invented the game. It is said that, having tired of the (8) Show answerPossible word here is rules (the phrase ‘rules and regulations’ are often put together). and regulations of football, he picked up the ball and ran with it, so laying down the new rules of a game called rugby. However, games played in a rugby style, involving kicking, catching and (9) Show answerPossible word here is running, moving, striking or jumping – we know from the word families that it is some kind of action. with the ball have been recorded as being in existence as far back as medieval times. The Welsh called such games ‘craipan’, the French ‘la soule’ and the Irish ‘caid’. Interestingly, Webb Ellis’s father was known to have spent time in Ireland and may well have passed on his (10) Show answerPossible word here is experience or knowledge. of ‘caid’ onto his son. But no matter however or whenever the game originated, there is no doubt that the All Blacks have the sport down to a fine art.

Do you have answers that you think are right but are not in this list? Post them in the comments section below and we’ll let you know!

Show All correct answers

Practice heading questions in IELTS 1

Practice heading questions in IELTS 1

We recommend you read this page about headings style questions before beginning this practice.

Read the following passage and select the best heading for each paragraph.

A. Lapped on all sides by water, it’s hardly surprising that the country’s largest city is a giant aquatic playpen, with its two harbours, a gulf full of islands, a rugged coast and the highest density per head of pleasure boats in the world. By ferry, boat or water taxi, some 48 islands make for a perfect cruise. Some offer homes for commuters and weekend retreaters. Others are only for native birds, flora and fauna, or for lifestylers seeking a bygone era. Then there is the volcano island of Rangitoto, with a cone so perfectly round it looks the same wherever you are.

Practice heading questions in IELTSB. Waiheke, a short ferry ride from Auckland, is a popular choice for those who prefer island living. Auckland’s long and sunny, sometimes humid, but mostly balmy days are at their summer best between January and April. This time of year brings Auckland dwellers outdoors to savour this lifestyle built on a nautical backdrop but underlined by artistic and sporting endeavours. The city is home to well over a million, including the world’s largest Polynesian population and an increasing swell of Asians. It is a colourful tapestry of culture, cuisine and a sophisticated manner befitting a grown-up metropolis. A free evening concert of fireworks and orchestra is an annual event in the Auckland Domain, below the majestic Auckland Museum. It draws a sea of picnickers, complete with chilly bins full of food and fine local wine. In winter, brisk weather is no deterrent to the thousands who swamp Eden Park to watch an invigorating game of rugby. No matter what time of year, Auckland always has an event or festival to celebrate.

C. Little wonder that more and more well-heeled and sometimes very famous folk fall for the city’s charm. They glide in on floating palaces, treating Auckland as a newfound southern Riviera. That they should have discovered the city and its pleasures is largely due to Team New Zealand bringing two defences of the prestigious international America’s Cup yacht race to the Hauraki Gulf. The Cup defence sparked a citywide spruce-up and the creation of a swank new Viaduct Harbour village, teeming with classy restaurants, boutiques, bars, hotels and apartments. Suburbs of Auckland are never far from beaches as golden sand and bath-like waters in the sheltered harbourside draw the barbecue brigade and families.

D. The North Shore, the community north of the Harbour Bridge, is well worth exploring. Ferries ply the harbour between downtown Auckland and Devonport, a sweet village that offers main street browsing and al fresco cafe lattes in the sun. Mt Victoria and North Head, with their war remnant defence bunkers, rise up behind the village. They’re perfect places for children to scramble and explore. Picturesque swimming beaches hug the shores that stretch to the north-east below.

E. The needle-shaped Sky Tower rises from the bustling commercial centre. The tower houses a casino, and madcap sky jumpers plunge over its side past diners eating in the revolving restaurant. Far below, motorways slither under and over each other in such a sprawl that one section is simply known as “spaghetti junction’. From the gourmet and trendy shopping strip of Ponsonby on the city fringe, to fashion-conscious Newmarket, upmarket Parnell and Remuera, from smart suburban malls to the Pacific Island markets in colourful Otara to the south, the sprawling city is an ever-changing mosaic.

F. It is a place where, half an hour from the centre, you can fish for snapper, tramp in a national park, or play golf on some of the most picturesque and challenging courses in the world. Its backyard brims with treats. There’s a beautiful garden smothered in scented roses. Another is planted by scent for the blind. You can drive up a volcano called One Tree Hill, fill up on culture and history at galleries and museums or land yourself in a virtual Antarctic at Kelly Tarlton’s Antarctic Encounter and Underwater World. But for a relaxing reward, nothing beats the lolling landscape carpeted in vineyards on the city’s outskirts, where a taste or three of some of the country’s premier wines is a pleasant way to end the day.

i. Messing about on the water
ii. Getting out of Auckland
iii. A bird’s-eye view
iv. Overwhelming choices
v. City lights
vi. Harbourside development
vii. Something for every season
viii. Over the Bridge
ix. Bird spotting

1. Paragraph A:
Show answer I

2. Paragraph B:
Show answer VII

3. Paragraph C:
Show answer VI

4. Paragraph D:
Show answer VIII

5. Paragraph E:
Show answer V

6. Paragraph F:
Show answer IV

Show All correct answers

False or not given in IELTS reading

Identifying the difference between ‘False’ and ‘Not given’ can sometimes be complicated, but a basic rule you can apply is this – are the 2 things both possible, or is only one possible?

To illustrate with a very simple example, if the text said ‘the sun is hot’ and the T/F/NG statement was ‘The sun is yellow’, you need to decide whether it is possible for something to be hot and yellow. In this case, the answer would be not given, because both are possible (they are not mutually exclusive).

However, if the statement was ‘The sun is cold’ then the answer is false because the it cannot be both hot and cold at the same time, therefore the answer is false.

Another useful rule of thumb is that if an answer is ‘false’ then you must be able to show specific evidence to support that, something that contradicts the statement. If you can find no evidence to contradict the statement, it’s ‘Not given’.

True False Not Given questions

True False Not Given questions

This type of question can be particularly difficult, especially when you need to decide whether the answer is NOT GIVEN or FALSE. Here’s a very simple example of this question type:

Text: Training to become a doctor involves long hours and little pay, and many trainees do not complete the course.

Q1. Trainee doctors are well paid. THIS IS CLEARLY FALSE – THE TEXT STATES THAT IT INVOLVES ‘LITTLE PAY’

Q2. It takes a long time to become a doctor. THIS IS NOT GIVEN – THE TEXT STATES THAT THEY WORK LONG HOURS (MEANING MORE THAN THE TYPICAL 8 HOURS A DAY) BUT DOESN’T SAY HOW LONG IT TAKES TO QUALIFY AS A DOCTOR

Q3. Some trainees do not study the full qualification. THIS IS TRUE – THE TEXT STATES THAT ‘MANY TRAINEES DO NOT COMPLETE THE COURSE’.

 

Try your skills with these TRUE / FALSE / NOT GIVEN exercises, but be careful – the text uses a lot of qualifying words (a common IELTS ‘trick’!).

Are the statements below the text TRUE, FALSE or NOT GIVEN? The questions are below the text.

 What is culture?

True False Not Given questions

Culture is defined as the ‘socially transmitted behaviour patterns, arts, beliefs, and institutions that are the expression of a particular class, community or period’  (www.dictionary.com). To most people, this  is seen in terms of books, paintings, rituals  and ceremonies, but recently there has  been a new entrant in the field of what is   considered to be ‘culture’ – the Internet.

On the Internet, science & art, media and mind combine to create a modern culture which is far more widespread than any of its predecessors. Not referring to the casual user who has no particular interest in the Internet, active supporters of the Internet as a culture have given themselves nomenclature to reflect their cultural aspirations – they are the new cyberpoets. A cyberpoet can be defined as ‘one who makes frequent trips to the edge of technology, society and traditional culture and strives to be artful in their use of virtual space’.

Supporter or opponent of this new culture, there is little doubt that the Internet offers a lot to our traditional view of culture. In just a few minutes in front of a keyboard, we can read almost anything that has ever been written, yet no paper had to be made, no library had to stay open and thus the cost remains minimal. All of this encourages even the casual surfer to explore further than he or she otherwise would have. The same effect can be observed with works of art. Previously available to be viewed only in museums if they were not in the hands of private collectors, all but a few famous works are now replicated on the Internet.

Yet the Internet is not merely a mirror of traditional culture – it is also a new culture in its own right. The medium of the Net allows for wider distribution and new platforms for most forms of art. ‘Kinetic art’ and other such computerised art forms occur with increasing regularity, both motivated by and generating an upsurge in popular and computer-mediated art.

In addition, if culture is said to be ‘socially transmitted’, then the Internet is remarkable in its ability to share, on an almost global scale, all the factors that constitute culture. We have only to hear the influence of jargon as we visit dub-dub-dub dot sites and surf the web to see how international the Internet has become to the majority.

Very few people would disagree that the cyberpoets are increasingly asserting themselves into popular culture. What is not so certain is how far this will go, as the Internet continues to assimilate more and more forms of culture, reaching global audiences. It is not inconceivable that our entire perception of culture will soon become cyber-focused.

Now answer the questions below. When you have finished, click ‘Finish quiz’. To see which of your answers were correct and the explanations why, click ‘View questions’.

Are the statements TRUE, FALSE or NOT GIVEN according to the text?

1. The majority of people consider ‘culture’ to be represented by traditional forms of art and literature.

click here to see the answer
True – Paragraph A states “To most people, this is seen in terms of books, paintings, rituals and ceremonies”

 

2. The internet as a culture is not extensive.

click here to see the answer
False – Paragraph B states ‘On the Internet, science and art, media and mind combine to create a modern culture which is far more widespread than any of its predecessors’. This is further supported later in Paragraph D, ‘The medium of the Net allows for wider distribution and new platforms for most forms of art’ therefore the internet as a culture IS extensive.

 

3. Through the Internet, every written word can be accessed.

click here to see the answer
False – the key here was to identify the qualifying word ‘every’ – Paragraph C states ‘In just a few minutes in front of a keyboard, we can read almost anything that has ever been written’ – almost is not a synonym for every.

 

4. The Internet provides a stage for all forms of art.

click here to see the answer
False – as with question 18, the key is in the qualifying word – the question says ‘all forms of art’, but Paragraph D states ‘most forms of art’

 

5. An insignificant number remain unaffected by the international nature of the Internet.

click here to see the answer
Not given – Paragraph E refers to the international nature of the internet, but we are not given specifics on numbers that are affected.

 

6. Only a few people believe that ‘cyberpoets’ are becoming part of our popular culture.

click here to see the answer
False – the text states ‘Very few people would disagree’ (Paragraph F) – very few would disagree means most would agree, which contradicts ‘Only a few people believe’ in the question.

Free IELTS General Training Reading test 4 Section 3

Go back to Section 1 | Go back to Section 2

This free IELTS reading test (General Training) has the same question types, content style, length and difficulty as a standard IELTS test. To get started simply scroll down to read the texts and answer the questions.

Free IELTS General Training Reading test 4 Section 3Looking for more reading practice tests? Our online course has over 15 complete practice tests as well as end of lesson tests and reading texts used in the lessons.

Important notes before you begin this section of the test:

  • There is a box beside each question for you to write your answer
  • When you have finished (or after any question) click the ‘Show answers’ link to see the answer(s) and an explanation. To have your answers automatically marked and instantly converted to a band score, join our complete online IELTS course
  • When you have finished on this page, count the number of correct answers you have and make a note. When you have completed the full test, go to the band score converter to find out your approximate IELTS band score

Section 3:

Weakness of the school system

A. By attempting to fit in as much as possible, the school day is continually being added to. In many ways, this would appear to be a good idea, as our knowledge and understanding of the world is always growing and it would seem logical to incorporate this into schools. The reality, however, has some decided drawbacks. There is a growing feeling amongst many that the modern school curriculum, in an effort to teach as many varied subjects as possible, is actually teaching students less. It seems that by constantly adding to what should be taught in the classroom, the classes are less focused, not offering the deeper learning that institutions perhaps should.

B. With classes sometimes only 30 minutes long, the overwhelming amount of information teachers are required to present often only gives students time to learn facts, not to think in any great detail about what they are being presented with. The problem is that students are not getting the opportunity to absorb what they are being taught as the curriculum expands in order to keep what has already been taught and supplement it with everything new that comes along. The weaknesses of such a system are clear – well informed though such students may be, there is the risk of an increasing number of graduates who have no real creative or intellectual ability. By denying students the opportunity to sit and think their way through problems, or even consider their own opinion, some schools are not always providing a truly educational atmosphere. There are, of course, certain aspects of education which need to be taught by simply inputting the information. Basic mathematics, for example. But there are many other subjects which could be best learned by having an opportunity to think and discuss what is being taught. Literature, writing and the social sciences are good examples of subjects which cannot be considered as ‘covered’ by a mass of information without the opportunity to discuss, debate or consider meaning or implications. There are also important social skills to be learned during such periods of open discussion, skills which are not addressed by an endless flow of teacher-centred information.

C. Teachers themselves have also voiced concerns about the amount of information they are required to impress upon their students. There is a feeling in many educational establishments that students are no longer being educated, but taught how to pass tests. In a world where academic success is too often measured by examination results, this is a serious concern. If there is too much information to simply be memorised and not enough time to truly assimilate it, what happens to students who fail to meet the grade? By current standards, they are failures, yet they may have great potential in areas not covered by the test and there are many students who, despite clear intellectual ability, simply do not perform well in tests. Again, the problem is one of focus, as education authorities are looking at the outcome of schooling rather than the content presented in the class.

D. It is here that many teachers feel the situation could be addressed at a local level. By giving more discretion to teachers, school courses could be tailored to suit the students rather than tailoring students to meet ever-expanding course requirements. In addition, by running a curriculum that gives options rather than defines an entire course, considerably more freedom would be possible. As it is, progression through most primary and secondary schools is regimented, and there is little room for students to identify and develop their own skills and strengths. If material could be chosen on the basis of its merits rather than simply because it has been put in the curriculum, then what is selected may be taught to a depth that would serve some purpose. There is, of course, a counter-argument, which claims that such open guidelines could lead to vast differences in standards between schools. What one teacher may see as essential for a student’s education, another may see as irrelevant, and this will result in students with widely different educational strengths.

E. With such a high-pressure learning environment, there are also a number of social aspects to schooling which need to be considered. The increased student workload cannot be covered in the classroom alone for the simple reason that there is not enough time in the average school week, and much of this extra workload has been pushed into the realm of homework. At its best, homework should be the opportunity to look in greater detail at what has been studied. In other words, to actually think about it and its relevance. The reality, however, is often very different. Concerned parents and overextended students are finding that homework is taking an increasingly large part of a student’s evening, cutting into time many feel should be spent as part of a child’s social education. Other social pressures have compounded the situation, as many of the areas of educating a young child which should be the responsibility of the parents have ill-advisedly become the school’s responsibility. Drug awareness and health issues, for example, are occupying an increasingly large part of the school day.

F. Many people believe that we should be teaching less, but teaching it better, and it is here that they think a solution can be found. Yet the process of rewriting a curriculum to incorporate only that which is essential but can be well learned would take far longer than most educational authorities have, and would be considered by many to be a ‘regressive’ step. Changes in the curriculum have largely been motivated by changes in the nature of employment, as job mobility demands that people know something about considerably more areas than were traditionally necessary. A little about a lot allows for the job mobility which has become so common. No matter what the final verdict may be, one thing is for sure – change will be slow, and not always for the best.

Questions 27 – 40

Questions 27 – 32

Choose the most suitable headings for sections A–F from the list below. Use each heading once only.

  1. A question of time
  2. Lack of teacher training
  3. Student success
  4. The argument for flexibility
  5. Importance of teaching experience
  6. Extra-curricular pressures
  7. The benefits of a varied curriculum
  8. Imbalanced focus
  9. Over-reliance on examinations
  10. Quality of quantity?
  1. Section A Show answerX
  2. Section B Show answerVIII
  3. Section C Show answerIX
  4. Section D Show answerIV
  5. Section E Show answerVI
  6. Section F Show answerI

Questions 23 – 37

Do the following statements agree with the views of the writer?

In boxes 33 -37 on your answer sheet write

Write YES if the statement agrees with the writer
NO if the statement does not agree with the writer
NOT GIVEN if there is no information about this in the passage

  1. Classes are often too short. Show answerNOT GIVEN
  2. No subjects can be comprehensively learned without time to discuss and debate the facts. Show answerNO
  3. Tests are a fair measure of ability. Show answerNO
  4. Schools are trying to be responsible for too many aspects of a child’s education. Show answerYES
  5. Future changes in the curriculum will improve the situation. Show answerNO

Questions 38 – 40

Complete the summary below using NO MORE THAN TWO WORDS from the text.

Too much emphasis is placed on learning (38) . The modern school curriculum is largely a response to increased (39) for which graduates are expected to have a much broader general knowledge. One potential solution to this could be to give individual schools (40) regarding what is taught.

38. Show answerFacts

39. Show answerJob mobility

40. Show answerMore discretion

Show All correct answers

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Once you have finished, check your answers then visit the IELTS band score converter to see what your band score would be.

Free IELTS General Training Reading test 4 Section 2

Go back to Section 1 | Section 3

This free IELTS reading test (General Training) has the same question types, content style, length and difficulty as a standard IELTS test. To get started simply scroll down to read the texts and answer the questions.

Free IELTS General Training Reading test 4 Section 2Looking for more reading practice tests? Our online course has over 15 complete practice tests as well as end of lesson tests and reading texts used in the lessons.

Important notes before you begin this section of the test:

  • There is a box beside each question for you to write your answer
  • When you have finished (or after any question) click the ‘Show answers’ link to see the answer(s) and an explanation. To have your answers automatically marked and instantly converted to a band score, join our complete online IELTS course
  • This is a General Training Section 2, which means there is either two or three short reading texts that you need to use to complete the section
  • When you have finished on this page, count the number of correct answers you have and make a note. When you have completed the full test, go to the band score converter to find out your approximate IELTS band score

Section 2

Negotiating a pay rise

For many people, one of the hardest discussions they have with senior management is about a raise in pay. Employees often choose to look for a better paid position within another company rather than face their own boss, but that is a situation that can have a negative impact on the employee (who is seen to lack loyalty to the company) and the employer (who stands to lose a trained staff member who works well and has a good knowledge of the company). However, there are some salary negotiation tactics that might just help.

The most common error is, when finally gathering the courage to address the situation, many employees simply immediately accept whatever offer is first made. Research shows that younger job-seekers and female job-seekers often make this mistake – either from not completely understanding the negotiation process or from a dislike or discomfort with the idea of negotiating. There is, of course, the financial aspect of not receiving a higher compensation, but more importantly this can have a significant effect on motivation and morale and can eventually lead an employee who hastily accepted an inadequate offer to begin to resent both the job and the employer.

Another common error is rating your required raise based on a value you personally need or would like. Few employers care whether you have enough money to pay for your mortgage or other bills, so negotiations should be based on your value to the company, based on good research of similar companies. In fact, one of the key factors in a successful salary negotiation is research and preparation. With the number and variety of salary resources available online — from www.salary.com and www.salaryexpert.com to professional associations – there should be no reason not to have an accurate market value in mind. However, if possible, the actual figure aimed for in the negotiation should not be revealed until the last possible moment, giving as much flexibility as possible. Immediately blurting out a figure it then becomes clear the company will not meet puts both the employer and employee in an uncomfortable position.

However, despite all the preparation and right attitude in the negotiation, there is another pitfall – declining an offer too quickly as it was lower than expected. A careful balance needs to be struck here; we have looked at the risks of accepting too quickly, but declining an offer can mean that the negotiation has nowhere to go. There are two points to consider at this juncture: a raise can also come in the form of other benefits such as better health cover, so if the money offered is low, think about discussing the perks of the job. The second point is that you have to be realistic – if the job market is low and the company is not having a particularly outstanding year, you may have to accept a lower offer. However, if this is the case, it is common to request a review of the salary at a time in the not-too-distant future.

The final point that is essential in any business negotiation is not to take any rejection or low offers personally. Employees should maintain a professional approach to their job, and a salary negotiation is no exception. If negotiations break down between you and the employer, move on graciously, thanking the employer again for the opportunity – because you never want to burn any bridges.

Section 2 Questions 15-27

Read the information below and answer Questions 15-20

Do the following statements agree with the information given in the text on the previous page?

In boxes 15-20 on your answer sheet, write

  • TRUE if the statement agrees with the information
  • FALSE if the statement contradicts the information
  • NOT GIVEN if there is no information on this

15. A mistake equally common across all types of employee is the premature acceptance of the first offer for a pay rise.
Show answer

FALSE – ‘…many employees ….Research shows that younger job-seekers and female job-seekers often make this mistake’

The difficulty with this question is the higher level of vocabulary used, and the fact that the statement is quite long. However, a very strong indicator that this statement is FALSE is thew use of the word ALL. Often when extreme words like this are used, the statement is false as the text will often state ‘many’, ‘most’ or ‘the majority’. In this case, the text states ‘many employees’ then refers to some types of employees who more commonly make this mistake. Did you know that TRUE, FALSE NOT GIVEN answers are always found in the same order as the text? That means when you find one answer, you know the answer to the next question is below it so you don’t have to read the text above! For more tips and hints, become a full member of our online membership course by clicking here.

16. Employees can become demoralised despite having a pay raise.
Show answer

TRUE – ‘this can have a significant effect on motivation and morale and can eventually lead an employee who hastily accepted an inadequate offer’

The key with this question is identifying that ‘demoralised’ in the question statement is expressed as ‘a significant effect on motivation and morale’ in the text. Did you know that TRUE, FALSE NOT GIVEN answers are always found in the same order as the text? That means when you find one answer, you know the answer to the next question is below it so you don’t have to read the text above! For more tips and hints, become a full member of our online membership course by clicking here.

17. Many people are unsuccessful in salary discussions because of poor research.
Show answer

NOT GIVEN

The text simply says that ‘one of the key factors in a successful salary negotiation is research and preparation’ – there is no mention of many people not researching. However, a useful keyword here to find the area where this is discussed is ‘research’. Did you know that TRUE, FALSE NOT GIVEN answers are always found in the same order as the text? That means when you find one answer, you know the answer to the next question is below it so you don’t have to read the text above! For more tips and hints, become a full member of our online membership course by clicking here.

18. It is important to clearly state what pay rise is expected at the beginning of the negotiation.
Show answer

FALSE – ‘the actual figure aimed for in the negotiation should not be revealed until the last possible moment’

This is one of the easier TRUE, FALSE NOT GIVEN questions – you are directly given a time frame (at the beginning of the negotiation), so all you need to do is scan for references to the amount of pay rise required and check the text for when this should be stated. Did you know that TRUE, FALSE NOT GIVEN answers are always found in the same order as the text? That means when you find one answer, you know the answer to the next question is below it so you don’t have to read the text above! For more tips and hints, become a full member of our online membership course by clicking here.

19. A negotiation could include a discussion of other benefits as well as salary.
Show answer

TRUE – ‘so if the money offered is low, think about discussing the perks of the job.’

This is more likely to be TRUE because of the use of ‘could’, which allows for more flexibility than ‘must’ or must not’. Did you know that TRUE, FALSE NOT GIVEN answers are always found in the same order as the text? That means when you find one answer, you know the answer to the next question is below it so you don’t have to read the text above! For more tips and hints, become a full member of our online membership course by clicking here.

20. You should avoid a pay negotiation when the employment market is not strong.
Show answer

NOT GIVEN

The text only says ‘be realistic’. Although not a paricularly difficult question, the most common error here is to consider the question logically without support from the text. Logically the answer would be TRUE, but remember that you are not being tested on your general knowledge or common sense – you must find support in the text for your answer to answer TRUE. Did you know that TRUE, FALSE NOT GIVEN answers are always found in the same order as the text? That means when you find one answer, you know the answer to the next question is below it so you don’t have to read the text above! For more tips and hints, become a full member of our online membership course by clicking here.


 

6 Rules for writing a successful cover letter

Rule #1
The first rule of most job applications is simple –never send your CV without a cover letter. Without it, your application will seem unprofessional and unprepared, and equally importantly, you will miss out on an opportunity to start ‘selling’ your abilities and qualifications to the potential employer.

Rule #2
When starting your cover letter, it is important to address it to a named individual rather than a general salutation like ‘Dear Sir or Madam’. It is, of course, very important that your cover letter is tailored specifically for the position you are applying for – sending an almost identical cover letter and CV to 10 employers is less likely to success than specifically targeting 2 or 3 and adapting your application to highlight the key features you feel are most relevant for the position.

Rule #3
From there, the next step is the first paragraph, and this is the point at which employers often make the crucial decision whether to consider your application or reject it. Avoid beginning with a standard, non-specific phrase such as ‘I am writing with regard the position advertised in…’; instead, try to be a little more dynamic – ‘My experience in the service industry offers much to a company that seeks motivated individuals in its employment, and am eager to put my solid education to work in a position such as the one you advertised in ..’. Obvious statements such as ‘Please find my CV enclosed’ written in a cover letter should also be avoided – the potential employer will be well aware of what has been enclosed. In total, the cover letter should never spill on to a second page – if it does, then you haven’t been succinct enough.

Rule #4
In your letter, your aim should be to highlight the areas in which the company would benefit from having you as an employee; make sure that you don’t make the mistake of writing about how the job would be of benefit to you. For example, ‘I feel that working for such a dynamic company would suit my personality’ would be better phrased as ‘I feel that I could contribute to such a dynamic company.’

Rule #5
Other points to bear in mind about your letter are that you should always avoid negativity in any form, and make sure you have included a number of ways that the employer can contact you, even if that same information is on your CV. The more work you make the employer do to offer you the job, the less inclined they may be to actually offer it. When you have finished your cover letter, read it again carefully (ideally, ask a friend to read it as you might not notice typographical or grammatical errors you have made). Once that’s done, make sure that you sign the letter by hand, preferably in blue ink to stand out from darker, printed text.

Rule #6
The final point is that if you are serious about applying for the position and are keen to get an interview, you should take the initiative in your letter and tell the employer that you will follow up. Opinions vary, but it is generally acceptable to call 3 days after sending the CV, without necessarily waiting for the closing date for applications.

Questions 21-27

For which rules are the following statements true?

Write the correct letter A-F in boxes 21 – 27 on your answer sheet.

NB You may use any letter more than once.

Rule #1
Rule #2
Rule #3
Rule #4
Rule #5
Rule #6

21. Simplify for the employer
Show answer

Rule #5 – “The more work you make the employer do to offer you the job, the less inclined they may be to actually offer it. ”

This is a classifying type question, and can be confusing because you need to consider three piece of information – the rule number, the questions statement and the text. Our complete online course has individual lessons with video presentations, narration, exercises and end of lesson tests for EVERY question type, so come and join us now at http://www.IELTStestONLINE.com

22. Don’t use redundant phrases
Show answer
Rule #3 – “Obvious statements such as ‘Please find my CV enclosed’ written in a cover letter should also be avoided ”

This is a classifying type question, and can be confusing because you need to consider three piece of information – the rule number, the questions statement and the text. Our complete online course has individual lessons with video presentations, narration, exercises and end of lesson tests for EVERY question type, so come and join us now at http://www.IELTStestONLINE.com

23. Avoid generalisations
Show answer
Rule #2 – “rather than a general salutation … very important that your cover letter is tailored specifically for the position you are applying for ”

This is a classifying type question, and can be confusing because you need to consider three piece of information – the rule number, the questions statement and the text. Our complete online course has individual lessons with video presentations, narration, exercises and end of lesson tests for EVERY question type, so come and join us now at http://www.IELTStestONLINE.com

24. Highlight your abilities to your employer
Show answer
Rule #1 – “‘selling’ your abilities and qualifications to the potential employer”

This is a classifying type question, and can be confusing because you need to consider three piece of information – the rule number, the questions statement and the text. Our complete online course has individual lessons with video presentations, narration, exercises and end of lesson tests for EVERY question type, so come and join us now at http://www.IELTStestONLINE.com

25. Focus on the employer
Show answer
Rule #4 – “highlight the areas in which the company would benefit from having you as an employee”

This is a classifying type question, and can be confusing because you need to consider three piece of information – the rule number, the questions statement and the text. Our complete online course has individual lessons with video presentations, narration, exercises and end of lesson tests for EVERY question type, so come and join us now at http://www.IELTStestONLINE.com

26. Add a personal touch
Show answer
Rule #5 – “make sure that you sign the letter by hand”

This is a classifying type question, and can be confusing because you need to consider three piece of information – the rule number, the questions statement and the text. Our complete online course has individual lessons with video presentations, narration, exercises and end of lesson tests for EVERY question type, so come and join us now at http://www.IELTStestONLINE.com

27. Keep it concise
Show answer
Rule #3 – “In total, the cover letter should never spill on to a second page – if it does, then you haven’t been succinct enough.”

This is a classifying type question, and can be confusing because you need to consider three piece of information – the rule number, the questions statement and the text. Our complete online course has individual lessons with video presentations, narration, exercises and end of lesson tests for EVERY question type, so come and join us now at http://www.IELTStestONLINE.com

Show All correct answers

Do you want your answer automatically marked and converted to a band score? Enrol in our complete online IELTS course to get 15 complete practice tests, over 80 lessons on EVERY aspect of IELTS and over 350 presentation videos with audio and narration. Start achieving results today!

Once you have finished, check your answers and keep a record of your correct answers, then move on to Section 3.