Category Archives: IELTS Reading (all)

reading-test

Free IELTS Academic Reading test 4 Section 2

Free IELTS Academic Reading test 4 Section 2

Go back to Section 1 | Go to Section 3

This free IELTS reading test (Academic Module) has the same question types, content style, length and difficulty as a standard IELTS test. To get started simply scroll down to read the texts and answer the questions.

Free IELTS Academic Reading test 4 Section 2Looking for more reading practice tests? Our online course has over 15 complete practice tests as well as end of lesson tests and reading texts used in the lessons.

When you have finished the test,make a note of the number of correct answers and move on to Section 3.


Section 2:


You should spend about 20 minutes on Questions 14 – 26, which are based on Reading Passage 2 on the following pages.

Auckland’s Iconic Volcanoes

The City of Auckland is built on a known, and potentially active, volcanic field, with its most recent eruption only 600 years ago.

A) Imagine a modern city of more than 1.5 million people built on an active volcanic field of more than 50 volcanoes, with scientists and experts predicting that an eruption is likely within the next thousand, or, some say, even, hundreds, of years, which is a very short time span in the world of geology. Each of the existing, and now dormant and extinct, volcanoes erupted for just one period of time – the oldest volcano erupting nearly 250,000 years ago – and the eruptions usually lasted for just weeks for most of the volcanoes, with the exception of the most recent eruption, Rangitoto Island, which blew about 600 years ago, and which repeatedly spewed lava with a series of explosions. This was a particularly violent eruption, as the lava came into contact with the sea, and has been noted as the first New Zealand volcanic eruption which would have been witnessed by humans.

B) The volcanoes beneath Auckland have driven upward from a field of basaltic magma, a single source, and a wide pool of magma about 100 km below the city. This differs from other, large, volcanoes which have a central core of magma working up from below the surface, in that each of Auckland’s volcanoes is a separate eruption from the same pool, pushing through the surface in different locations, rather like porridge bubbling under heat, and unlikely to repeat in the same spot. The eruptions have tended to be small by volcanic standards, with most being less than 150 metres in height, but have grown increasingly bigger over time, with Rangitoto, the most recent, being the largest, with estimates of its volume of spewn material at 60% of the total.


C) The first volcano was recorded as Onepoto Volcano, at roughly 248,000 years ago, and the volcanic field extends from Lake Pupuke in the north to Wiri Mountain in the south, and from Mount Albert in the west to Pigeon Island in the east. Many of the volcanoes have had lava flows that run to the sea, and Auckland is built on the remains of the scoria cone volcanoes, scoria being a type of basalt rock very dark in colour. The scoria rock is pockmarked with holes where gas was trapped as the lava cooled, and the scoria rock is now widely used in road-building, landscaping, used as fill, and some volcanoes have been mined and quarried to the point where the volcanic cones have been mainly levelled, and in some cases, dug below the ground to extract the scoria. Other volcanoes, such as Mt. Eden, with its famous crater, and One Tree Hill, have become iconic landmarks of the city, recognizable by their physical attributes. Another impressive feature is the network of labyrinthian caves and tubes below the surface, and in 1942, the then-mayor of the Mt. Eden borough, R.J. Mills, put forward the suggestion that the caves could be used as war-time shelters. This was not a preposterous idea, as the indigenous people, the Maori, had used the caves as warring meeting places, and also a sacred place to hold the remains of the dead.

D) The volcanoes in Auckland are different from other types of volcanoes in New Zealand, and, indeed, other types of volcanoes around the world. Beneath Auckland lies a single field of hot rock, known as a ‘plume’, which causes some rock to melt, and the molten, liquid, rock then pushes toward the surface, creating a new volcano each time. The three main types of volcanoes found around the world are what are known as, firstly, ‘composite’ or ‘strato’ volcanoes, which are steep-sided volcanic cones formed from layers of ash and lava flows which cause the volcano to form a very high mountain of lava and rock and dust. These are some of the most famous volcanoes in the world, such as Mt. Fuji in Japan and Mt. Pinatubo in the Philippines. A second type of volcano is known as the ‘shield’ volcano, which are the types of volcanoes associated with Hawaii, with generally low sloping sides with fast-moving lava strata, one on top of the other. And the third general type of volcano is called the ‘dome’ volcano, with steep sides and thick lava, which hardens rapidly so that it does not flow great distances. Examples of these are the many volcanoes in South America, such as the Chaiten lava dome which erupted in 2009. Auckland’s volcanoes are known as monogenetic, and, as the name suggests, they come from one source, the single field of hot rock. Other examples are found in Mexico and in British Columbia, in Canada.

E) So, the question must be asked, with a projected population of nearly 2 million people living on this field of hot, and sometimes molten, rock, what are the dangers associated with this natural phenomenon? As Auckland is New Zealand’s largest centre, and the commercial heart of the country, major infrastructure disruptions to transport, communications, and commercial and industrial activity would be expected, and the potential loss of residential and commercial buildings could see the shutting down of large portions of the city, if not the entire urban area. Scientists have noted that not only one eruption is possible, but many, over a short period of time. There are indications that 32,000 years ago there were five eruptions within 50 years. In addition to the immediate hazards an eruption would bring, there are also secondary dangers, such as shock waves, volcanic gases, earthquakes (which may also precede an eruption) and tsunamis.

F) To prepare for such eventualities, there is a network of civil defence and emergency services, as well as seismic monitoring stations, including satellite imagery which detects the slightest changes in the shape and bulging of the earth in the immediate region. Experts from the Ministry of Civil Defence note that the network of seismometers, which measure earth tremors linked to the movement of magma at deep levels indicate that the seismicity in the Auckland region is very low, which makes it easier to detect the ‘subtle signs of an impending eruption’. However, all experts agree that it is not a matter of if another volcano erupts, but when. Attention now turns to predicting and pinpointing where such an eruption might occur, the likely effects of a land-based eruption or one under the seabed, a ‘phreatomagmatic’ (steam-generating) eruption, and the required steps to limit the damage. The earth is ever-evolving, and Auckland’s dramatic volcanic past, and it’s potentially volatile future is testimony to this change.

 


Questions 14 – 19

 

Reading Passage 2 has six paragraphs, A – F.

Choose the correct heading for paragraphs A – F from the list of headings below.

Write the correct number, i – viii, in boxes 14 – 19 on your answer sheet.

 

NB There are more headings than paragraphs, so not all headings will be used.

List of Headings

  •  i       Auckland’s unique volcanic field  
  •  ii      Rangitoto, Auckland’s largest volcano
  •  iii     An unlikely scenario, with an uncertain future
  •  iv     Global categories of volcanoes
  •  v     Will there be another eruption?
  •  vi     Details of Auckland’s many volcanoes
  •  vii   Auckland’s volcanoes and volcanoes in other countries
  •  viii   The dangers of an eruption are many

14   Paragraph A 
Show answer iii   The opening sentence gives an ‘unlikely’ scenario, a city of more than 1.5 million people living on an active volcanic field, and discussing future eruptions, at an unknown time.

15   Paragraph B 
Show answer i   The key word is ‘unique’. The second sentence states, ‘This differs from…’.

16   Paragraph C 
Show answer vi   This paragraph gives much information about a number of volcanoes in Auckland.

17   Paragraph D 
Show answer iv   This paragraph details four main types of volcanoes around the world, and gives worldwide examples.

18    Paragraph E 
Show answer viii   This paragraph gives details about the dangers and the impact of an eruption, including secondary dangers.

19   Paragraph F 
Show answer v   This paragraph answers the question ‘Will there be…’ and states ‘not if, but when’ a future eruption might occur, and details the various monitoring systems in place.


Questions 20 – 24

The reading passage describes four basic types of volcanoes. Classify each of the statements according to the type of volcano.

Write the letters A – D in boxes 20 – 24 on your answer sheet.

NB You may use any letter more than once.

  • A   Shield
  • B   Monogenetic
  • C   Composite, or Strato
  • D   Dome

20   The volcano originates from a ‘plume’, a field of hot or molten rock.
Show answer B   Paragraph B states that Auckland’s volcanoes come from a ‘single source’, and Para D says they are ‘monogenetic’, coming from one source.

21   These are generally the highest volcanoes found.
Show answer C   Para D says ‘composite’ volcanoes are steep-sided with a ‘very high mountain of lava…’. The other volcanoes are lower, or not their height is not mentioned.

22   The lava cools quickly so that it stays localized.
Show answer D   Para D says the ‘lava hardens rapidly so that it does not flow great distances.’

23   Layers of lava flow quickly.
Show answer A   Para D says Shield volcanoes have ‘fast-moving lava strata, one on top of the other.’

24   One example of this type of volcano erupted recently.
Show answer D   Para D says Chaiten lava dome in South America erupted in 2009. Questions 25 – 26

Complete the sentences using NO MORE THAN THREE WORDS.

Write your answers in boxes 25 – 26 on your answer sheet.

25   As well as immediate destruction of infrastructure following an eruption, , such as air-borne tremors, gases and massive tidal waves, may occur.
Show answer secondary dangers   Para E describes the hazards of an eruption, with a key word ‘infrastructure’, and mentions ‘secondary dangers’, and gives examples.

26   A volcano which erupts under the ocean floor produces volumes of steam, and is known as a   volcano.
Show answer phreatomagmatic   Para F mentions volcanoes under the seabed (‘ocean floor’) and says they are steam-generating (‘produces volumes of steam’)./expand]

 

Show All correct answers

Once you have finished, check your answers, then move on to Section 3

reading-test

Free IELTS Academic Reading test 4 Section 1

Free IELTS Academic Reading test 4 Section 1

Go to Section 2 | Go to Section 3

This free IELTS reading test (Academic Module) has the same question types, content style, length and difficulty as a standard IELTS test. To get started, simply scroll down to read the texts and answer the questions.

Looking for more reading practice tests? Our online course has over 15 complete practice tests as well as end of lesson tests and reading texts used in the lessons.

To see which of your answers were marked as correct or incorrect, click ‘Show answer’. When completed, move on to Section 2.

Section 1:


Questions 1 – 13

You should spend about 20 minutes on Questions 1 – 13 which are based on Reading Passage 1 below.

Language Learning

Is the learning of a language the result of hard work, or an innate talent?

Free IELTS Academic Reading test 4 Section 1 With an increasingly globalized economy – and world, language continues to take on a growing and more and more crucial role in social and business communication. With countries, societies, companies and communities interacting more, it is vital that language is easily learned, understood and used to facilitate commerce, communication and cooperation. As a result, much attention has been focused recently on the science of linguistics, that is, language learning, by scholars and users, both the skills required and the difficulties encountered. Not only young children, the traditional learners of a new language, but also young adults, and, more and more, adults, business people, housewives, and those with an interest, are enrolling in courses in an attempt to master a second, or even a third, language.

So, what are the skills required, and what are the difficulties that are often encountered?  Many linguists hold the view that there is no specific skill involved, instead, it depends on the reason why a particular person is attempting to master another language. Robert Bigler, who is a simultaneous interpreter and speaks five languages fluently, and others with different degrees of fluency, says, “Learning a language requires dedication more than anything else. It is not difficult but certainly time-consuming. I’m convinced we all can learn any language to a degree that allows us to communicate in that language if we are serious about it. As long as you are motivated…, you will succeed.”

There is much debate among scholars as to the importance of innate ability, and whether it is connected with cognitive abilities. While it is generally recognized that learners with better cognitive skills, that is, understanding and learning abilities, will make greater progress, there is no general agreement as to whether there is a specific language learning skill that is stronger in some learners than others. For example, according to Peter Shoebottom, a linguist and teacher,research supports the idea that learning another language from the same language family will be easier than, say, a European learner attempting to master an Asian language, which suggests that there are other factors which are more important than ability or talent.

However, there is general agreement on some of the factors which assist language learning. Aaron Ralby, a director of one learning institute, insists that the method used, traditional or modern, books or computers or teachers, is not that important. What is important, he feels, is that the student should easily adapt to the method, because the learning takes place within the student. Another factor is one’s preconceived notions of how difficult learning a language may be. Many people believe learning a language is one of the most difficult learning  tasks. Jana Fadness, a multi-lingual speaker, learned Japanese, a difficult language for non-Asian speakers, and was not concerned with how ‘difficult’ the language might have been to learn, but rather felt that the reason driving the learning was more important. As she put it, “Rather than asking ourselves ‘Is this difficult?’, I think we should be asking ‘Is this really worth doing?’. If the answer is yes, then we should just do it. Difficulty is irrelevant.”

And the difficulties? As mentioned before, attitude is one serious hindrance in the acquisition of a second language. Attitude, as in believing that learning a language is too difficult, or even in questioning why one has to acquire a second language, or, specifically, a certain language, can be a major determining factor in success in learning. Linguists and experts who studied language learning in the 1970s in Canada found there was a poor success rate, in particular for the English-speaking population attempting to learn French, owing to the tension between the two populations at the time. As well, there is general agreement that ‘rigid thinking’, that is, a reluctance to accept, or even attempt to understand, other languages’ grammar rules, irregularities and new vocabulary, is a major obstacle to the acquisition of a new language. Again, there is growing belief that one of the key aspects in overcoming these obstacles is one’s attitude and desire to learn, often more so than a perceived innate ability.

Interestingly, Kerstin Hammes, who is the editor of an on-line site dealing with language learning, makes the observation that it is essential to have a basic understanding of how one’s own language works. This is an interesting viewpoint, given the tendency in most Western education systems to move away from a grammar-based English language discipline. The observation has often been made by scholars and educationists that it is likely that foreign language learners often have a better understanding of the grammar rules of the target language than the native speakers do, although native speakers obviously have an acquired grasp of the language stemming from childhood learning.

It would appear, then, that individual variations in the learning of a second language may be the most important factor in the degree of success in the taking on of a new language. Issues such as age, the question of learning in a classroom versus learning in a natural setting, motivation, desire, perceived biases against the second language and, indeed, ability, mean that the establishment of criteria necessary for successful language learning is a science far more complicated than initially considered. To return to the words of Robert Bigler, perhaps the crucial key is his observation that “As long as you are motivated…, you will succeed.” As much as in life as well.

 

Questions 1 – 5  

Do the following statements agree with the information given in Reading Passage 1?

In boxes 1 – 5 on your answer sheet write

  •      TRUE                      if the statement agrees with the information
  •      FALSE                    if the statement contradicts the information
  •      NOT GIVEN         if there is no information on this in the passage

 

1   The science of language learning has become an issue for academics, linguists and, indeed, the

learners themselves.
Show answer True   Para 1 mentions all the people who are interested in language learning, and why this is. “…much attention has been focused recently…”

2   Adults find it more difficult to learn a new language than young children do.
Show answer Not Given   Para 1 mentions that “young children, the traditional learners” are learning new languages, and also young adults and adults, but there is no mention of whether it is easier.

3   Evidence suggests that language learners find it much more difficult to learn languages from other language groups than their own.
Show answer True   Para 3 states that “learning another language from the same language family will be easier than… (another) language (family).

4   It is now believed that ‘rigid thinking’ is the most serious drawback in learning a new language.
Show answer Not given   Para 5 states that ‘rigid thinking’ is a major obstacle, but does not say it is the most serious.

5   On-line learning sites make it easier for learners to have a basic understanding of how language works.
Show answer Not Given   Para 6 mentions on-line sites and makes the point that ‘it is essential to have a basic understanding of one’s own language’, but does not say whether it is easier on-line.


Questions 6 – 10

The writer refers to various opinions offered made by individuals in the reading passage. Match the people (A – F) with the opinions made in Questions 6 – 10.

NB: Some names might not be used. Write the appropriate letter (A – F) in boxes 6 – 10 on your answer sheet.

A. Peter Shoebottom
B. Jana Fadness
C. Robert Bigler
D. Kerstin Hammes
E. Aaron Ralby
F. A general observation of linguists and academics

6. It’s not as important whether it’s a traditional or modern approach to language learning, rather, it’s how the the learner embraces the method.  Show answer E   Aaron Ralby Para 4 mentions ‘method’, but says it is not as important as how the learner adapts to it.

7. It is critical to have a grasp of your own language rules, which will help in understanding how language works.  Show answer D   Kerstin Hammes Para 6 says that Hammes believes ‘it is essential to have a basic understanding of how one’s own language works.’

8. Although learning a language can take a long time, the motivation of the learner is a key factor.  Show answer C   Robert Bigler Para 2 and Para 7 repeats the comment that ‘As long as your are motivated…, you will succeed.’

9. Language learners should not worry about the degree of difficulty involved, but rather, should focus on the reasons why they are learning the language.   Show answer B   Jana Fadness Para 4 says that Fadness ‘was not concerned with how ‘difficult’ the language might have been to learn’, and the rest of the paragraph develops this view.

10. It is not unusual for students of a language to better understand the grammar regulations of their new language than the native speakers.  Show answerF   General observation Para 6 states ‘the observation has often been made by scholars and educationists that it is likely that foreign language learners often have a better understanding of the grammar rules… than native speakers…’


Questions 11 – 13

Choose NO MORE THAN ONE WORD from Reading Passage 1 for each answer.

Write your answers in boxes 11 – 13 on your answer sheet.

  • It is universally believed that that those with better 11 ………….………………….. abilities will learn a language more easily than those who don’t possess these skills.
  • One problem for Canadians learning the other official language in their country in the 1970s was the 12 …………………………… between the speakers of the two official languages at the time.
  • Linguists agree that to be 13 ………………………….. is most likely to be one of the most critical factors in acquiring a second language.

11.    Show answer cognitive Para 3 ‘While it is generally recognized that learners with better cognitive skills… will make greater progress…’

12.    Show answer tension Para 5 states ‘…owing to the tension between the two populations at the time.’

13.     Show answer motivated Para 2 and Para 7 both state ‘As long as you are motivated…’, and Para 7 mentions a ‘crucial key’

 

Show All correct answers

Once you have finished, check your answers, then move on to  Section 2

reading-test

Free IELTS Academic Reading test 4 Section 3

Free IELTS Academic Reading test 4 Section 3

Go back to Section 1 | Go back to Section 2

This free IELTS reading test (Academic Module) has the same question types, content style, length and difficulty as a standard IELTS test. To get started simply scroll down to read the texts and answer the questions.

Free IELTS Academic Reading test 4 Section 3Looking for more reading practice tests? Our online course has over 15 complete practice tests as well as end of lesson tests and reading texts used in the lessons.

When you have finished the test,make a note of the number of correct answers check your score with our band score converter.

Section 3:

You should spend about 20 minutes on Questions 27-40, which are based on Reading Passage 3 below.


 

THE NON-MILITARY USES OF UNMANNED AERIAL VEHICLES

 

A. The use of unmanned aerial vehicles has grown dramatically over the past decade or so, in no small part due to the fact that some of these machines are able to remain airborne for longer periods of time than more conventional manned aircraft. At the same time, unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs), also known as unmanned aircraft systems (UASs), and remotely piloted aircraft (RPAs), nowadays commonly referred to as drones, are generally credited with being both more cost-effective to operate and maintain, as well as safer to use, than piloted aircraft. The term drone may also refer to small electric helicopters fitted with two or more rotors which are flown by remote control.

 

B. Today, drones are being used with increasing frequency for military operations by a number of countries in combat, surveillance and reconnaissance roles. These machines tend to be larger than non-military drones and are, in the main, powered by jet or gas engines. Perhaps unsurprisingly, the use of drone technology has gained a measure of notoriety as a result of their growing prominence in military roles, which have been widely publicised in television, online and print media during the last decade and a half, leading to criticism of their application in this arena on both ethical and legal grounds.

 

C. While originally and currently still primarily used for military purposes, the rapid growth and development in drone technology during the early twenty-first century has led some experts to predict that, by 2020, there will be approximately 30,000 licensed drones operating in the skies above the United States alone. It has also been estimated that the economic value of the commercial drone market will rise in value to around $90 billion globally during the next five years, as well as create as many as 150,000 new jobs by 2025. A projection by the Association for Unmanned Vehicle Systems International estimates that agricultural applications will one day account for approximately 80 percent of commercial drone use.

 

D. One development related to the commercial use of drones which has perhaps received the greatest amount of news and media coverage in recent years is the establishment of Amazon Prime Air in December 2013 by the US-based online retail giant, Amazon.com. At this stage, Amazon Prime Air’s drone-based delivery system for its customers’ purchases remains very much a work in progress, although the company has been granted permission by the US Federal Aviation Authority (FAA) to begin testing its current prototypes under certain restrictions.

 

E. As far as aerial filming and photography are concerned, commercial drones have a number of applications in industries ranging from those of movie production and the news media, to real estate, telecommunications and security. More specific uses in these fields include, though are by no means limited to, taking promotional photos and videos for commercial and residential properties on the market, filming breaking-news stories and live sports events, producing footage from unique perspectives for movies and carrying out security and surveillance functions in the detection of criminal activity and identification of criminals.

 

F. In addition to the delivery of consumer products and other commercial applications, non-military drones are gaining popularity for use in search and rescue operations. Drone-mounted cameras enable unmanned aerial vehicles to follow pre-programmed search patterns when looking for missing persons and victims of natural disasters across a variety of otherwise inaccessible terrain types, including marine environments. With the addition of infrared thermal imaging camera technology, drones can also carry out search and rescue missions after dark, with much greater manoeuvrability and at less cost than using a helicopter, for example.

 

G. These days, drones are increasingly being used by national government agencies and local authorities for a variety of purposes outside of the private sector. Transport agencies, both road and rail, make use of unmanned aerial vehicles for monitoring traffic flow and reporting accidents and hazards, while civil planners utilise the technology to assist with mapping and surveying work. Fire departments in some jurisdictions now rely on UAVs to help them reduce risks and costs when fighting fires in both urban and rural areas, while customs and law enforcement agencies also employ drone technology in protecting citizens and borders through monitoring and surveillance.

 

H. In terms of the natural world, scientists and researchers are turning to drones with greater frequency to monitor, document and assess changes in the health, movement and distribution of flora and fauna, as well as pollution, weather and the climate, both conveniently and cost-effectively. Unmanned aircraft are today being used not only in environmental and ecological research, but also as cutting-edge tools to assist in wildlife conservation efforts. In the latter capacity, drone technology is now being used by both governmental agencies and non-governmental organisations in the surveillance and prevention of illegal hunting and poaching of a number of endangered species.

 

I. While advocates of drones are quick to point out all of the many benefits that the machines can bring to society and the planet, the technology is not without its critics. Those opposed to the growing use of unmanned aerial vehicles cite a number of negative aspects related to the seemingly inexorable rise of drones and their myriad possible applications in our lives. These include logistical concerns such as the comparatively short flight times of smaller UAVs (presently between 30 and 45 minutes) and their operational limitations in terms of spatial mobility. Other perceived disadvantages are safety risks, in the potential for collisions across increasingly crowded airspace, and even the adverse effects drones may have on the natural environment, particularly as contributors to noise pollution.

 

J. Whether for commercial or recreational applications or being used as tools to assist those working in the public sector, it would appear that the numerical proliferation of unmanned aerial vehicles, as well as their numerous potential uses, means that the impact of drone technology in our lives is only set to increase. While there are undoubtedly issues yet to be resolved regarding the use of drones, particularly in relation to regulatory oversight and legal restrictions on the part of relevant authorities, the futuristic technology afforded us in the form of these robotic vehicles indicates that not the sky, but rather the solar system and beyond, may be the limit.

 


Questions 27-33

Reading Passage 3 has ten paragraphs, A-J.

Which paragraph contains the following information?

Write the correct letter, A-H, in boxes 27-32 on our answer sheet.

NB   You may use any letter more than once.

27     drone technology for use in farming
Show answer C Paragraph C states: “A projection by the Association for Unmanned Vehicle Systems International estimates that agricultural applications will one day account for approximately 80 percent of commercial drone use.”

28     potential drawbacks of non-military drones
Show answerI Paragraph I details “a number of negative aspects related to the seemingly inexorable rise of drones and their myriad possible applications in our lives.

29     the sale of housing
Show answerE Paragraph E reads: “commercial drones have a number of applications in industries ranging from those of movie production and the news media, to real estate, telecommunications and security. More specific uses in these fields include, though are by no means limited to, taking promotional photos and videos for commercial and residential properties on the market…”

30     the preservation of plants and animals
Show answerH Paragraph H states: “Unmanned aircraft are today being used not only in environmental and ecological research, but also as cutting-edge tools to assist in wildlife conservation efforts”

31     using drones at night
Show answer F Paragraph F states: “With the addition of infrared thermal imaging camera technology, drones can also carry out search and rescue missions after dark, with much greater manoeuvrability and at less cost than using a helicopter, for example”

32     employment opportunities related to UAVs
Show answer C Paragraph C reads: “It has also been estimated that the economic value of the commercial drone market will rise in value to be worth around $90 billion globally during the next five years, as well as create as many as 150,000 new jobs by 2025.”

33     the use of drones in monitoring automobiles
Show answer33 G Paragraph G states: “Transport agencies, both road and rail, make use of unmanned aerial vehicles for monitoring traffic flow and reporting accidents and hazards, while civil planners utilise the technology to assist with mapping and surveying work.”

 

Questions 34-38

Do the following statements agree with the information given in Reading Passage 3?

In boxes 38-40 on your answer sheet, write

  • TRUE                     if the statement agrees with the information
  • FALSE                   if the statement contradicts the information
  • NOT GIVEN         if there is no information on this

34      Drones are often cheaper to use than manned aircraft.
Show answer TRUE Paragraph A states that drones “are generally credited with being both more cost-effective to operate and maintain… …than piloted aircraft”

35       In the future, the majority of private sector drones are likely to be used in farming.
Show answer TRUE Paragraph C states: “A projection by the Association for Unmanned Vehicle Systems International estimates that agricultural applications will one day account for approximately 80 percent of commercial drone usage.”

36       Amazon is presently using drones to deliver items purchased online.
Show answer FALSE Paragraph D states that “Amazon Prime Air’s drone-based delivery system for its customers’ purchases remains very much a work in progress…”

37       Drone technology is used to help rescue people lost at sea.
Show answerTRUE Paragraph F states: “Drone-mounted cameras enable unmanned aerial vehicles to follow pre-programmed search patterns when looking for missing persons and victims of natural disasters across a variety of otherwise inaccessible terrain types, including marine environments…

38       Drones contribute to air pollution.
Show answer NOT GIVEN While Paragraph I mentions noise pollution, air pollution is NOT specifically mention in the passage. Questions 39-40

Choose TWO letters, A-E.

Which TWO of the following are mentioned as being risks or drawbacks associated with drone technology?

  • A      the cost of fighting fires
  • B      duration of flights
  • C       criminal activity
  • D       mid-air collisions
  • E       the unstoppable rise of drones

39.  Show answer B or D – Paragraph I mentions both “comparatively short flight times of smaller UAVs” and “the potential for collisions across increasingly crowded airspace” as “negative aspects related to the seemingly inexorable rise of drones”.

40.  Show answer B or D – Paragraph I mentions both “comparatively short flight times of smaller UAVs” and “the potential for collisions across increasingly crowded airspace” as “negative aspects related to the seemingly inexorable rise of drones”.

 

 Completed the reading test? Check your band score using the band score converter

reading-test

Free IELTS General Training Reading test 3 Section 3

Free IELTS General Training Reading test 3 Section 3

Go back to Section 1 | Go back to Section 2

This free IELTS reading test (General Training) has the same question types, content style, length and difficulty as a standard IELTS test. To get started simply scroll down to read the texts and answer the questions.

Free IELTS General Training Reading test 3 Section 3Looking for more reading practice tests? Our online course has over 15 complete practice tests as well as end of lesson tests and reading texts used in the lessons.

Important notes before you begin this section of the test:

  • There is a box beside each question for you to write your answer
  • When you have finished (or after any question) click the ‘Show answers’ link to see the answer(s) and an explanation
  • This is a General Training Section 2, which means there is either two or three short reading texts that you need to use to complete the section
  • When you have finished on this page, count the number of correct answers you have and make a note. When you have completed the full test, go to the band score converter to find out your approximate IELTS band score

 

Section 3

Ford – driving innovation

  1. In 1913 an American industrialist named Henry Ford employed an innovative system in his factory that changed the nature of American industry forever – the production line. Instead of a group of workers constructing a complete product, Ford’s production-line techniques relied on machine parts being moved around the factory on a conveyor belt, passing each employee who had a single task to perform before the component moved down the line. This saved time in that employees were not required to move around, collect materials or change tools; they simply stood in one place and repeated the same procedure over and over again until the end of their shift. In this way, Ford was able to mass produce the now famous Model-T car for only 10% of traditional labour costs.
  2. Working on a production line was monotonous work, undoubtedly, but it was not in the production line alone that Ford was something of a pioneer. In 1913 the average hourly rate for unskilled labour was under $2.50 and for such low wages and repetitive work, the labour turnover in Ford’s factory was high, with many employees lasting less than a month. In order to combat this problem, he took a step that was condemned by other industrialists of the time, fearful that they would lose their own workforce – he raised wages to $5 an hour. The benefits were twofold. Not only did Ford now have a stable and eager workforce, he also had potential customers. It was his intention ‘to build a motorcar for the great multitude’, and the Model-T car was one of the cheapest cars on the market at the time. At $5 an hour, many of his employees now found themselves in a position to feasibly afford a car of their own. Ford’s production practices meant that production time was reduced from 14 hours to a mere 93 minutes. In 1914 company profits were $30 million, yet just two years later this figure had doubled. Until 1927 when the last Model-T rolled off the production line, the company produced and sold about 15 million cars.
  3. Although Ford was without doubt successful, times changed and the company began losing its edge. One problem came from the labour force. Ford was a demanding employer who insisted that the majority of his staff remained on their feet during their shift. One error meant that the whole production line was often kept waiting, and Ford felt that workers were more attentive standing than sitting. Yet the 1930s saw some radical changes in the relationships between employer and employee, as an increasing number of industries were forming Labour Unions. Ford flatly refused to get involved, employing spies in the workplace to sabotage any plans for a union within his factories. Eventually a strike in the early 1940s forced Ford to deal with unions. Another example of Ford being unable to adapt came from his unwillingness to branch out. Ford’s competitors began operating the same systems and practices, but also introduced the variety Ford was lacking. The Model-T had remained essentially the same, even down to the colour, and by the time he realised his error, he had already lost his pre-eminence in the industry. Subsequent involvement in aeroplane manufacturing, politics and publishing was a failure. Leaving the company to his grandson in 1945, he died two years later leaving an inheritance estimated at $700 million.
  4. Yet the legacy of Fordism lives on. The development of mass production transformed the organisation of work in a number of important ways. Tasks were minutely subdivided and performed by unskilled workers, or at least semiskilled workers, since much of the skill was built into the machine. Second, manufacturing concerns grew to such a size that a large hierarchy of supervisors and managers became necessary. Third, the increasing complexity of operations required employment of a large management staff of accountants, engineers, chemists, and, later, social psychologists, in addition to a large distribution and sales force. Mass production also heightened the trend towards an international division of labour. The huge new factories often needed raw materials from abroad, while saturation of national markets led to a search for customers overseas. Thus, some countries became exporters of raw materials and importers of finished goods, while others did the reverse.
  5. In the 1970s and ’80s some countries, particularly in Asia and South America, that had hitherto been largely agricultural and that had imported manufactured goods, began industrialising. The skills needed by workers on assembly-line tasks required little training, and standards of living in these developing countries were so low that wages could be kept below those of the already industrialised nations. Many large manufacturers in the United States and elsewhere therefore began ‘outsourcing’ – that is, having parts made or whole products assembled in developing nations. Consequently, those countries are rapidly becoming integrated into the world economic community

Questions 28-40

Questions 28 -32

Choose the most suitable headings for Paragraphs A-E from the list below. Use each heading once only.

List of headings

  1. Effect on modern industry
  2. New payment procedures
  3. Labour problems
  4. The Model-T
  5. Creating a market
  6. Revolutionary production techniques
  7. The Ford family today
  8. Impact on the global economy
  9. Overseas competition
  1. Paragraph A
    Show answer VI
  2. Paragraph B
    Show answer V
  3. Paragraph C
    Show answer III
  4. Paragraph D
    Show answer I
  5. Paragraph E
    Show answer VIII

Questions 33 -37

Answer the following questions using NO MORE THAN TWO WORDS.

  1. What was the main saving of production line techniques?
    Show answer Time
  2. What level did Ford cut production costs down to compared with more traditional methods of the time?
    Show answer 10%
  3. When was the last Model-T Ford produced?
    Show answer 1927
  4. What did Ford unsuccessfully oppose the organisation of?
    Show answer Labour Unions
  5. What is the name given to the principles of mass production and associated practices
    Show answer Fordism

Questions 38 – 40

Complete the following summary using NO MORE THAN THREE WORDS FROM THE TEXT.

One of the long-term effects of Ford’s business practices was that many developing countries became industrialised as a result of (38) . For those working in the factory, the skills for (39) were easily acquired and (40) was minimal.

38. Show answer Outsourcing

39. Show answer Assembly line tasks

40. Show answer Training

 

 Completed the reading test? Check your band score using the band score converter

 

reading-test

Free IELTS Academic Reading test 3 Section 3

Free IELTS Academic Reading test 3 Section 3

Go back to Section 1 | Go back to Section 2

This free IELTS reading test (Academic Module) has the same question types, content style, length and difficulty as a standard IELTS test. To get started simply scroll down to read the texts and answer the questions.

Free IELTS Academic Reading test 3 Section 3Looking for more reading practice tests? Our online course has over 15 complete practice tests as well as end of lesson tests and reading texts used in the lessons.

When you have finished the test,make a note of the number of correct answers check your score with our band score converter.

Section 3:

 

Ford – driving innovation

  1. In 1913 an American industrialist named Henry Ford employed an innovative system in his factory that changed the nature of American industry forever – the production line. Instead of a group of workers constructing a complete product, Ford’s production-line techniques relied on machine parts being moved around the factory on a conveyor belt, passing each employee who had a single task to perform before the component moved down the line. This saved time in that employees were not required to move around, collect materials or change tools; they simply stood in one place and repeated the same procedure over and over again until the end of their shift. In this way, Ford was able to mass produce the now famous Model-T car for only 10% of traditional labour costs.
  2. Working on a production line was monotonous work, undoubtedly, but it was not in the production line alone that Ford was something of a pioneer. In 1913 the average hourly rate for unskilled labour was under $2.50 and for such low wages and repetitive work, the labour turnover in Ford’s factory was high, with many employees lasting less than a month. In order to combat this problem, he took a step that was condemned by other industrialists of the time, fearful that they would lose their own workforce – he raised wages to $5 an hour. The benefits were twofold. Not only did Ford now have a stable and eager workforce, he also had potential customers. It was his intention ‘to build a motorcar for the great multitude’, and the Model-T car was one of the cheapest cars on the market at the time. At $5 an hour, many of his employees now found themselves in a position to feasibly afford a car of their own. Ford’s production practices meant that production time was reduced from 14 hours to a mere 93 minutes. In 1914 company profits were $30 million, yet just two years later this figure had doubled. Until 1927 when the last Model-T rolled off the production line, the company produced and sold about 15 million cars.
  3. Although Ford was without doubt successful, times changed and the company began losing its edge. One problem came from the labour force. Ford was a demanding employer who insisted that the majority of his staff remained on their feet during their shift. One error meant that the whole production line was often kept waiting, and Ford felt that workers were more attentive standing than sitting. Yet the 1930s saw some radical changes in the relationships between employer and employee, as an increasing number of industries were forming Labour Unions. Ford flatly refused to get involved, employing spies in the workplace to sabotage any plans for a union within his factories. Eventually a strike in the early 1940s forced Ford to deal with unions. Another example of Ford being unable to adapt came from his unwillingness to branch out. Ford’s competitors began operating the same systems and practices, but also introduced the variety Ford was lacking. The Model-T had remained essentially the same, even down to the colour, and by the time he realised his error, he had already lost his pre-eminence in the industry. Subsequent involvement in aeroplane manufacturing, politics and publishing was a failure. Leaving the company to his grandson in 1945, he died two years later leaving an inheritance estimated at $700 million.
  4. Yet the legacy of Fordism lives on. The development of mass production transformed the organisation of work in a number of important ways. Tasks were minutely subdivided and performed by unskilled workers, or at least semiskilled workers, since much of the skill was built into the machine. Second, manufacturing concerns grew to such a size that a large hierarchy of supervisors and managers became necessary. Third, the increasing complexity of operations required employment of a large management staff of accountants, engineers, chemists, and, later, social psychologists, in addition to a large distribution and sales force. Mass production also heightened the trend towards an international division of labour. The huge new factories often needed raw materials from abroad, while saturation of national markets led to a search for customers overseas. Thus, some countries became exporters of raw materials and importers of finished goods, while others did the reverse.
  5. In the 1970s and ’80s some countries, particularly in Asia and South America, that had hitherto been largely agricultural and that had imported manufactured goods, began industrialising. The skills needed by workers on assembly-line tasks required little training, and standards of living in these developing countries were so low that wages could be kept below those of the already industrialised nations. Many large manufacturers in the United States and elsewhere therefore began ‘outsourcing’ – that is, having parts made or whole products assembled in developing nations. Consequently, those countries are rapidly becoming integrated into the world economic community

Questions 28-40

Questions 28 -32

Choose the most suitable headings for Paragraphs A-E from the list below. Use each heading once only.

List of headings

  1. Effect on modern industry
  2. New payment procedures
  3. Labour problems
  4. The Model-T
  5. Creating a market
  6. Revolutionary production techniques
  7. The Ford family today
  8. Impact on the global economy
  9. Overseas competition
  1. Paragraph A
    Show answer VI
  2. Paragraph B
    Show answer V
  3. Paragraph C
    Show answer III
  4. Paragraph D
    Show answer I
  5. Paragraph E
    Show answer VIII

Questions 33 -37

Answer the following questions using NO MORE THAN TWO WORDS.

  1. What was the main saving of production line techniques?
    Show answer Time
  2. What level did Ford cut production costs down to compared with more traditional methods of the time?
    Show answer 10%
  3. When was the last Model-T Ford produced?
    Show answer 1927
  4. What did Ford unsuccessfully oppose the organisation of?
    Show answer Labour Unions
  5. What is the name given to the principles of mass production and associated practices
    Show answer Fordism

Questions 38 – 40

Complete the following summary using NO MORE THAN THREE WORDS FROM THE TEXT.

One of the long-term effects of Ford’s business practices was that many developing countries became industrialised as a result of (38) some work to other countries. For those working in the factory, the skills for (39) were easily acquired and (40) was minimal.

38. Show answer Outsourcing

39. Show answer Assembly line tasks

40. Show answer Training

 

 Completed the reading test? Check your band score using the band score converter

reading-test

Free IELTS Academic Reading test 3 Section 2

Free IELTS Academic Reading test 3 Section 2

Go back to Section 1 | Go to Section 3

This free IELTS reading test (Academic Module) has the same question types, content style, length and difficulty as a standard IELTS test. To get started simply scroll down to read the texts and answer the questions.

Free IELTS Academic Reading test 3 Section 2Looking for more reading practice tests? Our online course has over 15 complete practice tests as well as end of lesson tests and reading texts used in the lessons.

When you have finished the test,make a note of the number of correct answers and move on to Section 3.

Section 2:

Virtual culture

  1. Culture is defined as the ‘socially transmitted behaviour patterns, arts, beliefs, and institutions that are the expression of a particular class, community or period’ (www.dictionary.com). To most people, this is seen in terms of books, paintings, rituals and ceremonies, but recently there has been a new entrant in the field of what is considered to be ‘culture’ – the Internet.
  2. On the Internet, science and art, media and mind combine to create a modern culture which is far more widespread than any of its predecessors. Not referring to the casual user who has no particular interest in the Internet, active supporters of the Internet as a culture have given themselves nomenclature to reflect their cultural aspirations – they are the new cyberpoets. A cyberpoet can be defined as ‘one who makes frequent trips to the edge of technology, society and traditional culture and strives to be artful in their use of virtual space’.
  3. Supporter or opponent of this new culture, there is little doubt that the Internet offers a lot to our traditional view of culture. In just a few minutes in front of a keyboard, we can read almost anything that has ever been written, yet no paper had to be made, no library had to stay open and thus the cost remains minimal. All of this encourages even the casual surfer to explore further than he or she otherwise would have. The same effect can be observed with works of art. Previously available to be viewed only in museums if they were not in the hands of private collectors, all but a few famous works are now replicated on the Internet.
  4. Yet the Internet is not merely a mirror of traditional culture – it is also a new culture in its own right. The medium of the Net allows for wider distribution and new platforms for most forms of art. ‘Kinetic art’ and other such computerised art forms occur with increasing regularity, both motivated by and generating an upsurge in popular and computer-mediated art.
  5. In addition, if culture is said to be ‘socially transmitted’, then the Internet is remarkable in its ability to share, on an almost global scale, all the factors that constitute culture. We have only to hear the influence of jargon as we visit dub-dub-dub dot sites and surf the web to see how international the Internet has become to the majority.
  6. Very few people would disagree that the cyberpoets are increasingly asserting themselves into popular culture. What is not so certain is how far this will go, as the Internet continues to assimilate more and more forms of culture, rising to a point where it is not inconceivable that our entire perception of culture will soon become cyber-focused.
  7. There is also a significant increase in transient imagery from photographs, videos and other media uploaded to many social networking sites. The rise of the term ‘selfie’, referring to a photograph taken by the person in the picture, is just one example – there are also applications for smartphones and tablet devices that allow instant video uploads, meaning that ‘looped’ videos lasting just a few seconds can be created to great effect. The problem, of course, is wading through the many millions of hours of footage that cannot be classified as having any cultural significance.
  8. Reliance on the internet itself has inherent risks, as the authorship of online content is now far less moderated. It is possible to set up a website in as little as an hour, populated with content which may be presented as accurate, impartial information but is in reality an ill considered, poorly researched collection of opinions and incorrect facts. Even established websites which allow users to contribute content can quickly become unreliable sources. Not only is there wider room for error, there is now a heightened concern that web pages and social media can reduce popular culture into a series of illogical and often abusive arguments, which do not need to be supported with facts or even ascribed to a specific purpose. The anonymous nature of a large percentage of internet interactions means that even the most bigoted point of view can find a forum, even if reactions to it are negative.

 


Questions 16-27

Questions 16 -21

Do the following statements agree with the information given in reading passage 2?

TRUE If the statement agrees with the information
FALSE If the statement contradicts the information
NOT GIVEN If there is no information on this

Write the correct answer TRUE, FALSE or NOT GIVEN in boxes 24-26 on your answer sheet.

  1. The majority of people consider ‘culture’ to be represented by traditional forms of art and media.
    Show answer True – Paragraph A states “To most people, this is seen in terms of books, paintings, rituals and ceremonies”
  2. The internet as a culture is not extensive.
    Show answer False – Paragraph B states ‘On the Internet, science and art, media and mind combine to create a modern culture which is far more widespread than any of its predecessors’. This is further supported later in Paragraph D, ‘The medium of the Net allows for wider distribution and new platforms for most forms of art’.
  3. Through the Internet, every written word can be accessed.
    Show answer False – the key here was to identify the qualifying word ‘every’ – Paragraph C states ‘In just a few minutes in front of a keyboard, we can read almost anything that has ever been written’ – almost is not a synonym for every.
  4. The Internet provides a stage for all forms of art.
    Show answer False – as with question 18, the key is in the qualifiying word – the question says ‘all forms of art’, but Paragraph D states ‘most forms of art’
  5. An insignificant number remain unaffected by the international nature of the Internet.
    Show answer Not given – Paragraph E refers to the international nature of the internet, but we are not given specifics on numbers that are affected.
  6. Only a few people believe that ‘cyberpoets’ are becoming part of our popular culture.
    Show answer False – the text states ‘Very few people would disagree’ (Paragraph F) – very few would disagree means most would agree, which contradicts ‘Only a few people believe’ in the question.

Questions 22 – 27

Which paragraph contains the following information. Write A – H for answers 22 to 27

  1. The range of resources available online has allowed more people to see versions of most artworks.
    Show answer C (‘ Previously available to be viewed only in museums if they were not in the hands of private collectors, all but a few famous works are now replicated on the Internet.’)
  2. Lack of clarity regarding the person responsible has an effect on cultural value of some web based resources
    Show answer H (‘The anonymous nature of a large percentage of internet interactions means that even the most bigoted point of view can find a forum’)
  3. Providing the ability to cross boundaries and be available worldwide
    Show answer E (‘We have only to hear the influence of jargon as we visit dub-dub-dub dot sites and surf the web to see how international the Internet has become to the majority.’)
  4. The emergence of new forms of culture thanks to digital possibilities
    Show answer D (‘‘Kinetic art’ and other such computerised art forms occur with increasing regularity, both motivated by and generating an upsurge in popular and computer-mediated art’)
  5. The wealth of online resources can mean difficulties in identifying areas of cultural significance
    Show answer G (‘The problem, of course, is wading through the many millions of hours of footage that cannot be classified as having any cultural significance.’)
  6. The self proclaimed title of supporters of internet culture
    Show answer B (‘active supporters of the Internet as a culture have given themselves nomenclature to reflect their cultural aspirations – they are the new cyberpoets’)

 

Show All correct answers

Once you have finished, check your answers, then move on to Section 3

reading-test

Free IELTS Academic Reading test 3 Section 1

Free IELTS Academic Reading test 3 Section 1

Go to Section 2 | Go to Section 3

This free IELTS reading test (Academic Module) has the same question types, content style, length and difficulty as a standard IELTS test. To get started, simply scroll down to read the texts and answer the questions.

Free IELTS Academic Reading test 3 Section 1Looking for more reading practice tests? Our online course has over 15 complete practice tests as well as end of lesson tests and reading texts used in the lessons.

To see which of your answers were marked as correct or incorrect, click ‘Show answer’. When completed, move on to Section 2.

Section 1:


Studying in New Zealand

  1. A relatively small island with a population of less than a quarter of that of Tokyo, New Zealand has a huge overseas student population. With over half a million fee-paying foreign students, an ever-increasing range of academic, professional and vocational courses and English language services are being created or expanded. But why do so many people come from overseas to study in New Zealand? Primarily, there is the fact that it has an excellent education system, especially in English language teaching. With its many British connections as well as the adoption of language from America, New Zealand offers a very international language. Language students are also enticed to New Zealand as they can fully immerse themselves in the language. This is only possible in a country where English is the spoken language.
  2. There are also strict government controls and standards on the quality of education offered. The government controls the education system, and it has appointed the New Zealand Qualifications Authority, a Ministry of Education and an Education Review Office, to license and control schools. These government bodies ensure that standards are as high in New Zealand as anywhere in the world. In addition, they decide whether or not language schools have the credentials and quality to operate. This allows students to have some peace of mind when choosing a school, but there are other reasons to choose New Zealand first. Independent reports have proven New Zealand to be the most cost-effective country in the western world for study fees, accommodation, cost of living, and recreation. It also has a reputation for safety and security, perhaps the best amongst western countries. Auckland City offers a multicultural and cosmopolitan place to shop, eat and be entertained. Less than an hour out of the city and you find yourself on beaches or mountains famous for their cleanliness and lack of pollution.
  3. Although a majority of international students spend some time in a language school, for those aged 13 to 18 New Zealand secondary schools provide a broad education. Other students take advantage of one of the many tertiary education institutions which form the New Zealand polytechnic system. These institutions are state-funded and provide education and training at many levels, from introductory studies to full degree programmes. University education was established in New Zealand in 1870 and has a similar tradition to the British university system. There are eight state-funded universities in New Zealand, all of them internationally respected for their academic and research performance. In addition to a centrally coordinated system of quality assurance audits at both institution and programme level, each university undertakes internal quality checks.
  4. All New Zealand universities offer a broad range of subjects in arts, commerce and science, but they have also specialised in narrower fields of study such as computer studies, medicine or environmental studies. Bachelor’s, Master’s and Doctorate degrees are offered by all New Zealand universities. A range of undergraduate and postgraduate diplomas are also available, along with Honours programmes (usually requiring an additional year of study). The first degree a student is able to gain in New Zealand is, as elsewhere, a Bachelor’s degree. With a completed Bachelor’s degree, a graduate may be able to go on to a number of other options. There are Postgraduate Diploma courses, Master’s degrees, Doctorates and even research positions available.
  5. The Postgraduate Diploma course takes one year on a full-time programme and is designed for graduates building on the academic field of their previous degree. The Master’s degree, like the Postgraduate Diploma, builds on a Bachelor’s degree but can take up to two years, by which time a thesis must be completed. The Master’s is the conventional pathway to the next level of education – the Doctorate. For this course, graduates are required to produce a research-based thesis as part of a course that takes a minimum of two years, and is by far the most challenging.
  6. Finally there is the possibility of research in New Zealand universities. Research is the main characteristic that distinguishes a university as opposed to a polytechnic or other tertiary education institution. New Zealand remains justifiably proud of the quality of its research as a large number of awards are presented to researchers from New Zealand universities.

 

Questions 1-15

Questions 1-5

Choose the most suitable headings for sections A and C –F from the list below.

List of headings

i. Why New Zealand?
ii. Course requirements
iii. Government funding
iv. Cost of further education
v. Further education options
vi. Overseeing authorities
vii. Specialisation
viii. Prestigious contribution
ix. Postgraduate choices

1. Section A
  Show answer I

Example Section B vi

2. Section C
Show answer III

3. Section D
Show answer V

4. Section E
Show answer IX

5. Section F
Show answer VIII


Questions 6 – 8

Complete the following sentences using NO MORE THAN THREE WORDS.

  1. The field of study in which New Zealand excels is…
    Show answer English language teaching
  2. Full immersion learning can only happen in an …
    Show answer English speaking country
  3. Educational standards are monitored by three…
    Show answer Government bodies

Questions 9-11

Look at the following statements and decide if they are right or wrong according to the information given.

Write

TRUE if the statement is true
FALSE if the statement is false
NOT GIVEN if the information is not given in the passage

Write the correct answer TRUE, FALSE or NOT GIVEN in boxes 9-11 on your answer sheet.

  1. Most international students start their studies in a secondary school.
    Show answer Not given
  2. Postgraduate students undertaking a diploma course extend what they have learned during their Bachelor’s degree.
    Show answer True
  3. All quality control at a tertiary level is done by the universities themselves
    Show answer False

Questions 12-15

Complete the flow chart below using NO MORE THAN TWO WORDS from the text.

test-3-flowchart

 

12.    Show answer Postgraduate diploma

13.    Show answer Masters degree

14.     Show answer Doctorate

15.     Show answer Research

 

Show All correct answers

Once you have finished, check your answers, then move on to  Section 2

reading-test

Free IELTS General Training Reading test 3 Section 2

Free IELTS General Training Reading test 3 Section 2

Go back to Section 1 | Section 3

This free IELTS reading test (General Training) has the same question types, content style, length and difficulty as a standard IELTS test. To get started simply scroll down to read the texts and answer the questions.

Free IELTS General Training Reading test 3 Section 2Looking for more reading practice tests? Our online course has over 15 complete practice tests as well as end of lesson tests and reading texts used in the lessons.

Important notes before you begin this section of the test:

  • There is a box beside each question for you to write your answer
  • When you have finished (or after any question) click the ‘Show answers’ link to see the answer(s) and an explanation
  • This is a General Training Section 2, which means there is either two or three short reading texts that you need to use to complete the section
  • When you have finished on this page, count the number of correct answers you have and make a note. When you have completed the full test, go to the band score converter to find out your approximate IELTS band score

Section 2

Read the text below and answer the questions that follow.

Corbridge teacher training

Welcome to the Corbridge teacher training course. Please keep this guide with you throughout the course so you know the structure of what you are studying.

Week 1
In the first week, trainees are typically introduced to different teaching methodologies and styles as modelled by your trainers. This first week requires a significant amount of reading and discussion, but at this point you will not be expected to do any teaching.

Week 2
During your second week, classroom practice begins. At this stage you will be delivering short lessons to small groups of students. You will not be required to plan the lessons at this point, but you will be observed by your peers. You will also be expected to hand in your first draft of assignment 1 – a lesson plan (at this point you will still be permitted to use published resources).

Week 3
At this point comes an intensive study into grammar; although you may know which tenses and voice to use for each situation, you need to develop the ability to actually impart this information in a coherent and learnable manner. For many trainees, it can come as a surprise to find that they actually had no clear understanding of the mechanics of their own language, and this can be as difficult to learn as it is for non-native speakers! You will also be presenting to larger groups of students and will be formally marked on your classroom performance. The first assignment needs to be handed in to your teacher trainers.

Week 4
You will deliver five lessons to varying group sizes, ages and on different aspects of the language; each lesson will be monitored and your final grade based on how you are assessed.  You will also be required to hand in your second assignment. Remember that, unlike the first assignment, this assignment must be computer typed.

NOTE: Towards the end of the course, the numbers of lessons trainees have to deliver increases, as does the criticism of their performance. There is a high dropout rate from the third week as many people find the pressure of being assessed by their mentors and their peers too much to handle, and the rate at which trainees leave increases in the following week. If you are feeling under pressure it is important to talk to your teacher trainer immediately.

Questions 15-20

For which rules are the following statements true? Write the correct letter A-D in boxes 15 – 17 on your answer sheet.
NB You may use any letter more than once.

  • A. Week #1
  • B. Week #2
  • C. Week #3
  • D. Week #4

15. The first assignment must be completed.
Show answer

C (week 3) – “The first assignment needs to be handed in to your teacher trainers” (in Week 2 a draft needs to be submitted)

16. The first assessed teaching is done.
Show answer

C (week 3) – “You will also be presenting to larger groups of students and will be formally marked on your classroom performance”

17. Different ways of teaching are demonstrated.
Show answer

A (week 1) – “different teaching methodologies and styles”

Look at the statements below. In boxes 24 – 26 on your answer sheet write,

  • TRUE if the statement agrees with the information
  • FALSE if the statement contradicts the information
  • NOT GIVEN if there is no information on this

18. Assignment 1 can be hand written.
Show answer

True – “Remember that, unlike the first assignment, this assignment must be computer typed”.

19. The grammar training is easy for native speakers.
Show answer

False – “For many trainees, it can come as a surprise to find that they actually had no clear understanding of the mechanics of their own language, and this can be as difficult to learn as it is for non-native speakers!”

20. The fourth week has the most trainees quitting the course.
Show answer

True – “There is a high dropout rate from the third week …and the rate at which trainees leave increases in the following week”.

 

Questions 21-26 relate to the reading passage below.

Read the text and answer the questions that follow.

To all staff

Starting the 3rd of next month, there will be a number training sessions for all staff. Attendance at the first and second session is compulsory, as well as one additional session which you may choose from the remaining options.  Please note that seating may be limited so you should arrange with your supervisor which of the sessions you would like to attend.

Session 1: Dealing with complaints. Ms Weldgrove will be facilitating this session aimed at making sure that all staff are aware of current office policy regarding complaints.  There have been some incidents recently that have not been handled effectively so this session will focus on appropriate procedures when dealing with complaints. As this is a compulsory session, attendance will be high so we will be using the main conference room on the third floor.

Session 2: Company image. As you should all be aware, the company is changing its image and branding colours, and this is expected to be completed within the next month. This will require a number of changes to the logo, stationery and uniforms for front-of-house staff. Business cards will be changed, although this is expected to take a little longer. Mark Lorins has organised and will run this training session, focusing on what is expected from your during the changeover period. This will also be held in the conference room on the third floor

Session 3: Word processing suite. Gordon Sumner will be offering training in the new word processing software that is being installed in all departments over the next few weeks. There will also be a guest speaker from MacroSwift to introduce the new Visual Presentation software. The session will be in the computer room; there are 70 places available for this seminar so it is recommended you confirm attendance as soon as possible to avoid disappointment.

Session 4: Internal communication systems. This is more of a refresher course, in that Jane Williams will be running through policies and procedures for internal messaging that you should already be familiar with. She will be joined by Ruth Madocs from the HR department. Due to space requirements, this session will be held in the conference room in the Logan Hotel.

Questions 21-23

Choose the correct letter A, B, C or D.

Write your answers in boxes 21-23 on your answer sheet.

21. Staff…

  • A. must attend all sessions.
  • B. must attend only the first and second session.
  • C. do not have to attend if they make arrangements with their supervisor.
  • D. must attend 3 sessions.


Show answer

D – “Attendance at the first and second session is compulsory, as well as one additional session”

 

22. The first session…

  • A.is about how to make a complaint.
  • B. has been arranged because of previous problems.
  • C. will be held outside the company.
  • D. is likely to have few attendees.


Show answer

B – “There have been some incidents recently that have not been handled effectively so this session will focus on appropriate procedures when dealing with complaints.”

 

23. The third session…

  • A. is the only one to have two facilitators
  • B. will have 2 speakers from another company
  • C. is already fully booked
  • D. has limited seating


Show answer

 D – “there are 70 places available for this seminar”

Questions 24-26

Answer the questions below using NO MORE THAN THREE WORDS OR A NUMBER from the passage for each answer.

Write your answers in boxes 24-26 on your answer sheet.

24. Which session will not be held in the company? 
Show answer

Session 4: “this session will be held in the conference room in the Logan Hotel.”

25. Which session will have two facilitators from within the company? 
Show answer

Session 4: “Jane Williams … joined by Ruth Madocs from the HR department” (session 3 has a facilitator from another company)

26. Which session is to prepare staff for future changes? 
Show answer

Session 2: “… changing its image and branding colours, and this is expected to be completed within the next month”

27. Which session is to discuss recent problems? 
Show answer

Session 1: “Dealing with complaints…. There have been some incidents recently that have not been handled effectively”

Show All correct answers


 

You have now completed Section 2. Take a note of the number of correct answers, then move on to Section 3.

reading-test

Free IELTS General Training Reading test 3 Section 1

Free IELTS General Training Reading test 3 Section 1

Section 1

Section 2 | Section 3

This free IELTS reading test (General Training) has the same question types, content style, length and difficulty as a standard IELTS test. To get started simply scroll down to read the texts and answer the questions.

Free IELTS General Training Reading test 3 Section 1Looking for more reading practice tests? Our online course has over 15 complete practice tests as well as end of lesson tests and reading texts used in the lessons.

When you have finished the test, click the ‘Finish quiz’ button. To see which of your answers were marked as correct or incorrect, click the ‘View questions’ button. When completed, move on to Section 2.

Section 1:


 

Dear Householder,

Request for unwanted but useful items for school jumble sale

As part of this year’s fund-raising event, Edgehill College will be holding a jumble sale on May 24th. All profits will be used to assist in funding of the new children’s play ground in the centre of town.

We are now requesting donations of unwanted but useful items of usable quality to sell on our jumble sale stalls. We would much appreciate donations in any of the following categories:

  • Clothes – Please place washed items in bags or boxes and mark them ‘For Men’, ‘For Women’ or ‘For Children’
  • Kitchenware – any items are of use (e.g. plates, cups, glasses, cooking utensils, kitchen equipment such as food mixers etc), currently in short supply.
  • Books– complete books (no missing pages), we are especially looking for children’s novels.
  • Miscellaneous – Ornaments, pictures, toys, games, handbags etc. Please place in boxes and write the names of the items inside clearly on the box.

We will also be collecting food which will be donated to the local homeless shelter. If you wish to make a food donation please provide tinned, dried or packet foodstuffs only.  Please do not donate food items that are likely to spoil.

If you are able to, please bring your donated items to the school reception (Monday to Friday between 9.30am and 3.00pm).  Otherwise, for larger loads, if you are unable to get to school, we can arrange for a member of the team to collect your items. Please ring 762 8894 and ask to speak to Mr William Taylor our School Liaison Officer who will arrange for one of our volunteer parents to pick up your donation.

On a final note, we are also still looking for additional volunteers to take care of stalls on the day of the jumble sale.  The event will take place between 9.30am and 2pm. If you are free on that day and willing to help out, please contact the Deputy Headmistress Mrs Jayne Browne on 762 8889.

Thank you in advance for your help and support. We look forward to seeing you on May 24th.

Best wishes
Karl Blackman
Headmaster


Questions 1-14

Read the information below and answer Questions 1-4

Match the pictures below to the appropriate statement. Write the correct letter A-D in boxes 1 – 4 on your answer sheet.

A. Should only be packaged in boxes.
B. The school does not have many of these items to sell at the moment.
C. Should be labelled in one of three ways.
D. The school wants more of these which would be suitable for youngsters.

IELTS General Training reading test

1.
Show answer

B – ‘Miscellaneous – Ornaments, pictures, toys, games, handbags etc. Please place in boxes and write the names of the items inside clearly on the box.’

2.
Show answer

C – Kitchenware – any items are of use (e.g. plates, cups, glasses, cooking utensils, kitchen equipment such as food mixers etc), currently in short supply.

3.
Show answer

D – Clothes – Please place washed items in bags or boxes and mark them‘For Men’, ‘For Women’ or ‘For Children’

4.
Show answer

A – ‘Books– complete books (no missing pages), we are especially looking for children’s novels.’

 

Questions 5-9

Look at the statements below. In boxes 5 – 9 on your answer sheet write,

TRUE if the statement agrees with the information

FALSE if the statement contradicts the information

NOT GIVEN if there is no information on this

5. The event is being held to raise money for school facilities.
Show answer

FALSE – ‘All profits will be used to assist in funding of the new children’s play ground in the centre of town. ‘

6. The school is collecting fresh fruit and vegetables to donate to a homeless shelter.
Show answer

FALSE – ‘If you wish to make a food donation please provide tinned, dried or packet foodstuffs only. Please do not donate food items that are likely to spoil.’

7. Items will be picked up by volunteers between 9.30am and 3pm.
Show answer

NOT GIVEN – ‘If you are able to, please bring your donated items to the school reception (Monday to Friday between 9.30am and 3.00pm).Otherwise, for larger loads, if you are unable to get to school, we can arrange for a member of the team to collect your items.’ – The text does not say when the items will be collected, only when they can be taken to school.

8. Mr William Taylor will make arrangements for items to be collected.
Show answer

TRUE – ‘Please ring 762 8894 and ask to speak to Mr William Taylor our School Liaison Officer who will arrange for one of our volunteer parents to pick up your donation.’

9. All helpers for the event are now confirmed.
Show answer

FALSE – ‘On a final note, we are also still looking for additional volunteers to take care of stalls on the day of the jumble sale. ‘

 


Examples of Books Available at Edgehill School Jumble Sale!

  1. A delightful children’s story suitable for those who have recently started to learn to read. The tale and illustrations follow the story of the heroic Sam and the friends he meets on his travels across Europe. Great fun for parents and children to enjoy together.
  2. A must for any art appreciator.  Informative historical accounts and full page illustrations based upon acclaimed Masters from France, Italy and Germany during the 19th and 20th Century.
  3. Young and enquiring minds will adore this book. Over 500 pages of information ranging from the field of science to history, geography and art. This special addition also includes end of chapter quizzes to check understanding.  A superb learning tool!
  4. Lovers of hiking and the great outdoors will appreciate this! It has lots of information on lesser known tracks for those wishing to escape the more usual paths and trails used by the masses. Enjoy this picturesque part of the country in solitude.
  5. A useful handbook for lovers of the great outdoors.  Informative regarding tips for lighting campfires, setting up and cooking. An up to date list of various places to stay throughout the country.
  6. An academic appreciation and comparison of inspiration in the past.  Exploration of art work in Egyptian and Greek culture and its significance in evolution of creativity.
  7. Stimulate your children’s natural curiosity and artistic flair – a wide range of subject matters are covered, from bird and wildlife – easy to follow steps from creative models and drawings to Plaster of Paris modeling and origami.

The list of book titles has seven story descriptions A-G. Choose the correct title for each book from the list of titles below. Write the correct number i-ix in boxes 10 – 14 on your answer sheet.

List of Book Titles
  1. A Guide to Walks in the Peak District
  2. The Children’s Guide to Bird-watching
  3. European Art
  4. Get the Most out of Camping
  5. Ancient Art
  6. The Children’s Encyclopedia
  7. Creative Pastimes for Children
  8. Mystical Egypt
  9. The Adventures of Sammy Swan


EXAMPLE Book A ix

10. Book B
Show answer

iii – ‘A must for any art appreciator. Informative historical accounts and full page illustrations based upon acclaimed Masters from France, Italy and Germany during the 19th and 20th Century.

11. Book C
Show answer

vi – ‘Young and enquiring minds will adore this book. Over 500 pages of information ranging from the field of science to history, geography and art. This special addition also includes end of chapter quizzes to check understanding. A superb learning tool!’

12. Book D
Show answer

i – ‘Lovers of hiking and the great outdoors will appreciate this! It has lots of information on lesser known tracks for those wishing to escape the more usual paths and trails used by the masses. Enjoy this picturesque part of the country in solitude. ‘
EXAMPLE Book E iv

13. Book F
Show answer

v – ‘An academic appreciation and comparison of inspiration in the past. Exploration of art work in Egyptian and Greek culture and its significance in evolution of creativity.’

14. Book G
Show answer

vii – ‘Stimulate your children’s natural curiosity and artistic flair – a wide range of subject matters are covered, from bird and wildlife – easy to follow steps from creative models and drawings to Plaster of Paris modeling and origami.

Show All correct answers

You have now completed Section 1. Take a note of the number of correct answers, then move on to Section 2.

gifu

Reading practice exercise

 

Reading practice exercise

Brush up on your reading skills with this short text and questions.

Note: The text is NOT full the length of a normal IELTS reading test – this is a shortened version for some quick practice! See if you can complete it under 10 minutes.


Read the text below and answer the 10 questions that follow:

 

Gifu castle is one of the most beautiful sight-seeing attractions in central Japan. The closest township is Gifu, which has a population of approximately four hundred thousand people and is the prefectural capital. There are several noteworthy places in the region, including Ozaki castle and Sekigahara, the site of Japan’s most famous battle, the Battle of Sekigahara (1603) a monumental victory for Ieyasu Tokugawa, the renowned warlord of Edo, now Japan’s capital city, Tokyo.

gifuIn order to ascend to Gifu castle, which is perched atop the seventy metre high Mount Kinka, there is a cable car or for the more athletic sight-seer there are many trails to the castle and museum. The shortest of these trails takes around one hour to reach the castle, at a steady pace. Walking the trails is not recommended during the winter months as the tracks can become slippery and dangerous.

The present day castle which was built with concrete and timber in the 1950’s, is based upon the 16th century building. It was governed and inhabited by the notorious warlord Oda Nobunaga, the most feared of all Japanese warlords who met a treacherous death near the modern day city of Kyoto in 1582, after one of his most trusted generals, Akechi Mitsuhide turned against him. Mitsuhide ordered the buildings of Honno-ji temple be set alight, forcing the great warlord Nobunaga to commit seppuku, the samurai form of suicide.

The castle consists of three levels and contains many displays of weapons, maps, military equipment, portraits of Nobunaga and other artifacts from the period. On the third level, for those without any fear of heights, there is an observation platform from which viewers can look out across the Nagara river valley towards the city of Nagoya.

There is a small cafe and restaurant providing light refreshments near the cable car entrance, a five minute walk from the castle.

Comprehension Questions (True or False)

1/. The present day castle was built in the sixteenth century.
Click here to show the answer

FALSE

2/. Akechi Mitsuhide governed Gifu castle.
Click here to show the answer

FALSE

3/. It takes about one hour to reach the castle on foot.
Click here to show the answer

TRUE

4/. Oda Nobunaga was killed in the Battle of Sekigahara.
Click here to show the answer

FALSE

5/. The population of Gifu is approximately 400,000 people.
Click here to show the answer

TRUE

 

Comprehension Questions (short answer – use no more than 3 words and/or a  number)

6/. Who betrayed Oda Nobunaga, forcing his death?
Click here to show the answer

Akechi Mitsuhide

7/. When did Oda Nobunaga die?
Click here to show the answer

1582

8/. When was the modern day castle built?
Click here to show the answer

In the 1950’s

9/. What is the capital of Gifu prefecture?
Click here to show the answer

Gifu City

10/. What can visitors see from the third floor beyond the river?
Click here to show the answer

Nagoya (City)