Category Archives: IELTS Reading General (tests)

Free IELTS General Training Reading test 3 Section 3

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Free IELTS General Training Reading test 3 Section 3

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This free IELTS reading test (General Training) has the same question types, content style, length and difficulty as a standard IELTS test. To get started simply scroll down to read the texts and answer the questions.

Free IELTS General Training Reading test 3 Section 3Looking for more reading practice tests? Our online course has over 15 complete practice tests as well as end of lesson tests and reading texts used in the lessons.

Important notes before you begin this section of the test:

  • There is a box beside each question for you to write your answer
  • When you have finished (or after any question) click the ‘Show answers’ link to see the answer(s) and an explanation
  • When you have finished on this page, count the number of correct answers you have and make a note. When you have completed the full test, go to the band score converter to find out your approximate IELTS band score

 

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Section 3

Ford – driving innovation

  1. In 1913 an American industrialist named Henry Ford employed an innovative system in his factory that changed the nature of American industry forever – the production line. Instead of a group of workers constructing a complete product, Ford’s production-line techniques relied on machine parts being moved around the factory on a conveyor belt, passing each employee who had a single task to perform before the component moved down the line. This saved time in that employees were not required to move around, collect materials or change tools; they simply stood in one place and repeated the same procedure over and over again until the end of their shift. In this way, Ford was able to mass produce the now famous Model-T car for only 10% of traditional labour costs.
  2. Working on a production line was monotonous work, undoubtedly, but it was not in the production line alone that Ford was something of a pioneer. In 1913 the average hourly rate for unskilled labour was under $2.50 and for such low wages and repetitive work, the labour turnover in Ford’s factory was high, with many employees lasting less than a month. In order to combat this problem, he took a step that was condemned by other industrialists of the time, fearful that they would lose their own workforce – he raised wages to $5 an hour. The benefits were twofold. Not only did Ford now have a stable and eager workforce, he also had potential customers. It was his intention ‘to build a motorcar for the great multitude’, and the Model-T car was one of the cheapest cars on the market at the time. At $5 an hour, many of his employees now found themselves in a position to feasibly afford a car of their own. Ford’s production practices meant that production time was reduced from 14 hours to a mere 93 minutes. In 1914 company profits were $30 million, yet just two years later this figure had doubled. Until 1927 when the last Model-T rolled off the production line, the company produced and sold about 15 million cars.
  3. Although Ford was without doubt successful, times changed and the company began losing its edge. One problem came from the labour force. Ford was a demanding employer who insisted that the majority of his staff remained on their feet during their shift. One error meant that the whole production line was often kept waiting, and Ford felt that workers were more attentive standing than sitting. Yet the 1930s saw some radical changes in the relationships between employer and employee, as an increasing number of industries were forming Labour Unions. Ford flatly refused to get involved, employing spies in the workplace to sabotage any plans for a union within his factories. Eventually a strike in the early 1940s forced Ford to deal with unions. Another example of Ford being unable to adapt came from his unwillingness to branch out. Ford’s competitors began operating the same systems and practices, but also introduced the variety Ford was lacking. The Model-T had remained essentially the same, even down to the colour, and by the time he realised his error, he had already lost his pre-eminence in the industry. Subsequent involvement in aeroplane manufacturing, politics and publishing was a failure. Leaving the company to his grandson in 1945, he died two years later leaving an inheritance estimated at $700 million.
  4. Yet the legacy of Fordism lives on. The development of mass production transformed the organisation of work in a number of important ways. Tasks were minutely subdivided and performed by unskilled workers, or at least semiskilled workers, since much of the skill was built into the machine. Second, manufacturing concerns grew to such a size that a large hierarchy of supervisors and managers became necessary. Third, the increasing complexity of operations required employment of a large management staff of accountants, engineers, chemists, and, later, social psychologists, in addition to a large distribution and sales force. Mass production also heightened the trend towards an international division of labour. The huge new factories often needed raw materials from abroad, while saturation of national markets led to a search for customers overseas. Thus, some countries became exporters of raw materials and importers of finished goods, while others did the reverse.
  5. In the 1970s and ’80s some countries, particularly in Asia and South America, that had hitherto been largely agricultural and that had imported manufactured goods, began industrialising. The skills needed by workers on assembly-line tasks required little training, and standards of living in these developing countries were so low that wages could be kept below those of the already industrialised nations. Many large manufacturers in the United States and elsewhere therefore began ‘outsourcing’ – that is, having parts made or whole products assembled in developing nations. Consequently, those countries are rapidly becoming integrated into the world economic community

Questions 28-40

Questions 28 -32

Choose the most suitable headings for Paragraphs A-E from the list below. Use each heading once only.

List of headings

  1. Effect on modern industry
  2. New payment procedures
  3. Labour problems
  4. The Model-T
  5. Creating a market
  6. Revolutionary production techniques
  7. The Ford family today
  8. Impact on the global economy
  9. Overseas competition
  1. Paragraph A
    Show answer VI
  2. Paragraph B
    Show answer V
  3. Paragraph C
    Show answer III
  4. Paragraph D
    Show answer I
  5. Paragraph E
    Show answer VIII

Questions 33 -37

Answer the following questions using NO MORE THAN TWO WORDS.

  1. How where parts moved around the factory using Ford’s production techniques?
    Show answer (A)/(BY) CONVEYOR BELT
  2. What level did Ford cut production costs down to compared with more traditional methods of the time?
    Show answer 10%
  3. When was the last Model-T Ford produced?
    Show answer 1927
  4. What did Ford unsuccessfully oppose the organisation of?
    Show answer Labour Unions
  5. What is the name given to the principles of mass production and associated practices
    Show answer Fordism

Questions 38 – 40

Complete the following summary using NO MORE THAN THREE WORDS FROM THE TEXT.

One of the long-term effects of Ford’s business practices was that many developing countries became industrialised as a result of (38) . For those working in the factory, the skills for (39) were easily acquired and (40) was minimal.

38. Show answer Outsourcing

39. Show answer Assembly line tasks

40. Show answer Training

 

 Completed the reading test? Check your band score using the band score converter

 

Free IELTS General Training Reading test 3 Section 2

Free IELTS General Training Reading test 3 Section 2

Go back to Section 1 | Section 3

This free IELTS reading test (General Training) has the same question types, content style, length and difficulty as a standard IELTS test. To get started simply scroll down to read the texts and answer the questions.

Free IELTS General Training Reading test 3 Section 2Looking for more reading practice tests? Our online course has over 15 complete practice tests as well as end of lesson tests and reading texts used in the lessons.

Important notes before you begin this section of the test:

  • There is a box beside each question for you to write your answer
  • When you have finished (or after any question) click the ‘Show answers’ link to see the answer(s) and an explanation
  • This is a General Training Section 2, which means there is either two or three short reading texts that you need to use to complete the section
  • When you have finished on this page, count the number of correct answers you have and make a note. When you have completed the full test, go to the band score converter to find out your approximate IELTS band score

Section 2

Read the text below and answer the questions that follow.

Corbridge teacher training

Welcome to the Corbridge teacher training course. Please keep this guide with you throughout the course so you know the structure of what you are studying.

Week 1
In the first week, trainees are typically introduced to different teaching methodologies and styles as modelled by your trainers. This first week requires a significant amount of reading and discussion, but at this point you will not be expected to do any teaching.

Week 2
During your second week, classroom practice begins. At this stage you will be delivering short lessons to small groups of students. You will not be required to plan the lessons at this point, but you will be observed by your peers. You will also be expected to hand in your first draft of assignment 1 – a lesson plan (at this point you will still be permitted to use published resources).

Week 3
At this point comes an intensive study into grammar; although you may know which tenses and voice to use for each situation, you need to develop the ability to actually impart this information in a coherent and learnable manner. For many trainees, it can come as a surprise to find that they actually had no clear understanding of the mechanics of their own language, and this can be as difficult to learn as it is for non-native speakers! You will also be presenting to larger groups of students and will be formally marked on your classroom performance. The first assignment needs to be handed in to your teacher trainers.

Week 4
You will deliver five lessons to varying group sizes, ages and on different aspects of the language; each lesson will be monitored and your final grade based on how you are assessed.  You will also be required to hand in your second assignment. Remember that, unlike the first assignment, this assignment must be computer typed.

NOTE: Towards the end of the course, the numbers of lessons trainees have to deliver increases, as does the criticism of their performance. There is a high dropout rate from the third week as many people find the pressure of being assessed by their mentors and their peers too much to handle, and the rate at which trainees leave increases in the following week. If you are feeling under pressure it is important to talk to your teacher trainer immediately.

Questions 15-20

For which rules are the following statements true? Write the correct letter A-D in boxes 15 – 17 on your answer sheet.
NB You may use any letter more than once.

  • A. Week #1
  • B. Week #2
  • C. Week #3
  • D. Week #4

15. The first assignment must be completed.
Show answer

C (week 3) – “The first assignment needs to be handed in to your teacher trainers” (in Week 2 a draft needs to be submitted)

16. The first assessed teaching is done.
Show answer

C (week 3) – “You will also be presenting to larger groups of students and will be formally marked on your classroom performance”

17. Different ways of teaching are demonstrated.
Show answer

A (week 1) – “different teaching methodologies and styles”

Look at the statements below. In boxes 24 – 26 on your answer sheet write,

  • TRUE if the statement agrees with the information
  • FALSE if the statement contradicts the information
  • NOT GIVEN if there is no information on this

18. Assignment 1 can be hand written.
Show answer

True – “Remember that, unlike the first assignment, this assignment must be computer typed”.

19. The grammar training is easy for native speakers.
Show answer

False – “For many trainees, it can come as a surprise to find that they actually had no clear understanding of the mechanics of their own language, and this can be as difficult to learn as it is for non-native speakers!”

20. The fourth week has the most trainees quitting the course.
Show answer

True – “There is a high dropout rate from the third week …and the rate at which trainees leave increases in the following week”.

 

Questions 21-26 relate to the reading passage below.

Read the text and answer the questions that follow.

To all staff

Starting the 3rd of next month, there will be a number training sessions for all staff. Attendance at the first and second session is compulsory, as well as one additional session which you may choose from the remaining options.  Please note that seating may be limited so you should arrange with your supervisor which of the sessions you would like to attend.

Session 1: Dealing with complaints. Ms Weldgrove will be facilitating this session aimed at making sure that all staff are aware of current office policy regarding complaints.  There have been some incidents recently that have not been handled effectively so this session will focus on appropriate procedures when dealing with complaints. As this is a compulsory session, attendance will be high so we will be using the main conference room on the third floor.

Session 2: Company image. As you should all be aware, the company is changing its image and branding colours, and this is expected to be completed within the next month. This will require a number of changes to the logo, stationery and uniforms for front-of-house staff. Business cards will be changed, although this is expected to take a little longer. Mark Lorins has organised and will run this training session, focusing on what is expected from your during the changeover period. This will also be held in the conference room on the third floor

Session 3: Word processing suite. Gordon Sumner will be offering training in the new word processing software that is being installed in all departments over the next few weeks. There will also be a guest speaker from MacroSwift to introduce the new Visual Presentation software. The session will be in the computer room; there are 70 places available for this seminar so it is recommended you confirm attendance as soon as possible to avoid disappointment.

Session 4: Internal communication systems. This is more of a refresher course, in that Jane Williams will be running through policies and procedures for internal messaging that you should already be familiar with. She will be joined by Ruth Madocs from the HR department. Due to space requirements, this session will be held in the conference room in the Logan Hotel.

Questions 21-23

Choose the correct letter A, B, C or D.

Write your answers in boxes 21-23 on your answer sheet.

21. Staff…

  • A. must attend all sessions.
  • B. must attend only the first and second session.
  • C. do not have to attend if they make arrangements with their supervisor.
  • D. must attend 3 sessions.


Show answer

D – “Attendance at the first and second session is compulsory, as well as one additional session”

 

22. The first session…

  • A.is about how to make a complaint.
  • B. has been arranged because of previous problems.
  • C. will be held outside the company.
  • D. is likely to have few attendees.


Show answer

B – “There have been some incidents recently that have not been handled effectively so this session will focus on appropriate procedures when dealing with complaints.”

 

23. The third session…

  • A. is the only one to have two facilitators
  • B. will have 2 speakers from another company
  • C. is already fully booked
  • D. has limited seating


Show answer

 D – “there are 70 places available for this seminar”

Questions 24-26

Answer the questions below using NO MORE THAN THREE WORDS OR A NUMBER from the passage for each answer.

Write your answers in boxes 24-26 on your answer sheet.

24. Which session will not be held in the company? 
Show answer

Session 4: “this session will be held in the conference room in the Logan Hotel.”

25. Which session will have two facilitators from within the company? 
Show answer

Session 4: “Jane Williams … joined by Ruth Madocs from the HR department” (session 3 has a facilitator from another company)

26. Which session is to prepare staff for future changes? 
Show answer

Session 2: “… changing its image and branding colours, and this is expected to be completed within the next month”

27. Which session is to discuss recent problems? 
Show answer

Session 1: “Dealing with complaints…. There have been some incidents recently that have not been handled effectively”

Show All correct answers


 

You have now completed Section 2. Take a note of the number of correct answers, then move on to Section 3.

Free IELTS General Training Reading test 3 Section 1

Free IELTS General Training Reading test 3 Section 1

Section 1

Section 2 | Section 3

This free IELTS reading test (General Training) has the same question types, content style, length and difficulty as a standard IELTS test. To get started simply scroll down to read the texts and answer the questions.

Free IELTS General Training Reading test 3 Section 1Looking for more reading practice tests? Our online course has over 15 complete practice tests as well as end of lesson tests and reading texts used in the lessons.

When you have finished the test, click the ‘Finish quiz’ button. To see which of your answers were marked as correct or incorrect, click the ‘View questions’ button. When completed, move on to Section 2.

Section 1:


 

Dear Householder,

Request for unwanted but useful items for school jumble sale

As part of this year’s fund-raising event, Edgehill College will be holding a jumble sale on May 24th. All profits will be used to assist in funding of the new children’s play ground in the centre of town.

We are now requesting donations of unwanted but useful items of usable quality to sell on our jumble sale stalls. We would much appreciate donations in any of the following categories:

  • Clothes – Please place washed items in bags or boxes and mark them ‘For Men’, ‘For Women’ or ‘For Children’
  • Kitchenware – any items are of use (e.g. plates, cups, glasses, cooking utensils, kitchen equipment such as food mixers etc), currently in short supply.
  • Books– complete books (no missing pages), we are especially looking for children’s novels.
  • Miscellaneous – Ornaments, pictures, toys, games, handbags etc. Please place in boxes and write the names of the items inside clearly on the box.

We will also be collecting food which will be donated to the local homeless shelter. If you wish to make a food donation please provide tinned, dried or packet foodstuffs only.  Please do not donate food items that are likely to spoil.

If you are able to, please bring your donated items to the school reception (Monday to Friday between 9.30am and 3.00pm).  Otherwise, for larger loads, if you are unable to get to school, we can arrange for a member of the team to collect your items. Please ring 762 8894 and ask to speak to Mr William Taylor our School Liaison Officer who will arrange for one of our volunteer parents to pick up your donation.

On a final note, we are also still looking for additional volunteers to take care of stalls on the day of the jumble sale.  The event will take place between 9.30am and 2pm. If you are free on that day and willing to help out, please contact the Deputy Headmistress Mrs Jayne Browne on 762 8889.

Thank you in advance for your help and support. We look forward to seeing you on May 24th.

Best wishes
Karl Blackman
Headmaster


Questions 1-14

Read the information below and answer Questions 1-4

Match the pictures below to the appropriate statement. Write the correct letter A-D in boxes 1 – 4 on your answer sheet.

A. Should only be packaged in boxes.
B. The school does not have many of these items to sell at the moment.
C. Should be labelled in one of three ways.
D. The school wants more of these which would be suitable for youngsters.

IELTS General Training reading test

1.
Show answer

B – ‘Miscellaneous – Ornaments, pictures, toys, games, handbags etc. Please place in boxes and write the names of the items inside clearly on the box.’

2.
Show answer

C – Kitchenware – any items are of use (e.g. plates, cups, glasses, cooking utensils, kitchen equipment such as food mixers etc), currently in short supply.

3.
Show answer

D – Clothes – Please place washed items in bags or boxes and mark them‘For Men’, ‘For Women’ or ‘For Children’

4.
Show answer

A – ‘Books– complete books (no missing pages), we are especially looking for children’s novels.’

 

Questions 5-9

Look at the statements below. In boxes 5 – 9 on your answer sheet write,

TRUE if the statement agrees with the information

FALSE if the statement contradicts the information

NOT GIVEN if there is no information on this

5. The event is being held to raise money for school facilities.
Show answer

FALSE – ‘All profits will be used to assist in funding of the new children’s play ground in the centre of town. ‘

6. The school is collecting fresh fruit and vegetables to donate to a homeless shelter.
Show answer

FALSE – ‘If you wish to make a food donation please provide tinned, dried or packet foodstuffs only. Please do not donate food items that are likely to spoil.’

7. Items will be picked up by volunteers between 9.30am and 3pm.
Show answer

NOT GIVEN – ‘If you are able to, please bring your donated items to the school reception (Monday to Friday between 9.30am and 3.00pm).Otherwise, for larger loads, if you are unable to get to school, we can arrange for a member of the team to collect your items.’ – The text does not say when the items will be collected, only when they can be taken to school.

8. Mr William Taylor will make arrangements for items to be collected.
Show answer

TRUE – ‘Please ring 762 8894 and ask to speak to Mr William Taylor our School Liaison Officer who will arrange for one of our volunteer parents to pick up your donation.’

9. All helpers for the event are now confirmed.
Show answer

FALSE – ‘On a final note, we are also still looking for additional volunteers to take care of stalls on the day of the jumble sale. ‘

 


Examples of Books Available at Edgehill School Jumble Sale!

  1. A delightful children’s story suitable for those who have recently started to learn to read. The tale and illustrations follow the story of the heroic Sam and the friends he meets on his travels across Europe. Great fun for parents and children to enjoy together.
  2. A must for any art appreciator.  Informative historical accounts and full page illustrations based upon acclaimed Masters from France, Italy and Germany during the 19th and 20th Century.
  3. Young and enquiring minds will adore this book. Over 500 pages of information ranging from the field of science to history, geography and art. This special addition also includes end of chapter quizzes to check understanding.  A superb learning tool!
  4. Lovers of hiking and the great outdoors will appreciate this! It has lots of information on lesser known tracks for those wishing to escape the more usual paths and trails used by the masses. Enjoy this picturesque part of the country in solitude.
  5. A useful handbook for lovers of the great outdoors.  Informative regarding tips for lighting campfires, setting up and cooking. An up to date list of various places to stay throughout the country.
  6. An academic appreciation and comparison of inspiration in the past.  Exploration of art work in Egyptian and Greek culture and its significance in evolution of creativity.
  7. Stimulate your children’s natural curiosity and artistic flair – a wide range of subject matters are covered, from bird and wildlife – easy to follow steps from creative models and drawings to Plaster of Paris modeling and origami.

The list of book titles has seven story descriptions A-G. Choose the correct title for each book from the list of titles below. Write the correct number i-ix in boxes 10 – 14 on your answer sheet.

List of Book Titles
  1. A Guide to Walks in the Peak District
  2. The Children’s Guide to Bird-watching
  3. European Art
  4. Get the Most out of Camping
  5. Ancient Art
  6. The Children’s Encyclopedia
  7. Creative Pastimes for Children
  8. Mystical Egypt
  9. The Adventures of Sammy Swan


EXAMPLE Book A ix

10. Book B
Show answer

iii – ‘A must for any art appreciator. Informative historical accounts and full page illustrations based upon acclaimed Masters from France, Italy and Germany during the 19th and 20th Century.

11. Book C
Show answer

vi – ‘Young and enquiring minds will adore this book. Over 500 pages of information ranging from the field of science to history, geography and art. This special addition also includes end of chapter quizzes to check understanding. A superb learning tool!’

12. Book D
Show answer

i – ‘Lovers of hiking and the great outdoors will appreciate this! It has lots of information on lesser known tracks for those wishing to escape the more usual paths and trails used by the masses. Enjoy this picturesque part of the country in solitude. ‘
EXAMPLE Book E iv

13. Book F
Show answer

v – ‘An academic appreciation and comparison of inspiration in the past. Exploration of art work in Egyptian and Greek culture and its significance in evolution of creativity.’

14. Book G
Show answer

vii – ‘Stimulate your children’s natural curiosity and artistic flair – a wide range of subject matters are covered, from bird and wildlife – easy to follow steps from creative models and drawings to Plaster of Paris modeling and origami.

Show All correct answers

You have now completed Section 1. Take a note of the number of correct answers, then move on to Section 2.

Free IELTS General Training Reading test 1 Section 2

Free IELTS General Training Reading test 1 Section 2

Go back to Section 1 | Go to Section 3

This free IELTS reading test (General Training) has the same question types, content style, length and difficulty as a standard IELTS test. To get started simply scroll down to read the texts and answer the questions.

Free IELTS General Training Reading test 1 Section 2Looking for more reading practice tests? Our online course has over 15 complete practice tests as well as end of lesson tests and reading texts used in the lessons.

When you have finished the test, click the ‘Finish quiz’ button. To see which of your answers were marked as correct or incorrect, click the ‘View questions’ button. When completed, move on to Section 3.

Section 2:

 

General Training reading test #1

 

Free IELTS General Training Reading test 1 Section 3

Free IELTS General Training Reading test 1 Section 3

Go back to Section 1 | Go back to Section 2

This free IELTS reading test (General Training) has the same question types, content style, length and difficulty as a standard IELTS test. To get started simply scroll down to read the texts and answer the questions.

Free IELTS General Training Reading test 1 Section 3Looking for more reading practice tests? Our online course has over 15 complete practice tests as well as end of lesson tests and reading texts used in the lessons.

When you have finished the test,make a note of the number of correct answers check your score with our band score converter.

Section 3:

 

Weakness of the school system

A. By attempting to fit in as much as possible, the school day is continually being added to. In many ways, this would appear to be a good idea, as our knowledge and understanding of the world is always growing and it would seem logical to incorporate this into schools. The reality, however, has some decided drawbacks. There is a growing feeling amongst many that the modern school curriculum, in an effort to teach as many varied subjects as possible, is actually teaching students less. It seems that by constantly adding to what should be taught in the classroom, the classes are less focused, not offering the deeper learning that institutions perhaps should.

B. With classes sometimes only 30 minutes long, the overwhelming amount of information teachers are required to present often only gives students time to learn facts, not to think in any great detail about what they are being presented with. The problem is that students are not getting the opportunity to absorb what they are being taught as the curriculum expands in order to keep what has already been taught and supplement it with everything new that comes along. The weaknesses of such a system are clear – well informed though such students may be, there is the risk of an increasing number of graduates who have no real creative or intellectual ability. By denying students the opportunity to sit and think their way through problems, or even consider their own opinion, some schools are not always providing a truly educational atmosphere. There are, of course, certain aspects of education which need to be taught by simply inputting the information. Basic mathematics, for example. But there are many other subjects which could be best learned by having an opportunity to think and discuss what is being taught. Literature, writing and the social sciences are good examples of subjects which cannot be considered as ‘covered’ by a mass of information without the opportunity to discuss, debate or consider meaning or implications. There are also important social skills to be learned during such periods of open discussion, skills which are not addressed by an endless flow of teacher-centred information.

C. Teachers themselves have also voiced concerns about the amount of information they are required to impress upon their students. There is a feeling in many educational establishments that students are no longer being educated, but taught how to pass tests. In a world where academic success is too often measured by examination results, this is a serious concern. If there is too much information to simply be memorised and not enough time to truly assimilate it, what happens to students who fail to meet the grade? By current standards, they are failures, yet they may have great potential in areas not covered by the test and there are many students who, despite clear intellectual ability, simply do not perform well in tests. Again, the problem is one of focus, as education authorities are looking at the outcome of schooling rather than the content presented in the class.

D. It is here that many teachers feel the situation could be addressed at a local level. By giving more discretion to teachers, school courses could be tailored to suit the students rather than tailoring students to meet ever-expanding course requirements. In addition, by running a curriculum that gives options rather than defines an entire course, considerably more freedom would be possible. As it is, progression through most primary and secondary schools is regimented, and there is little room for students to identify and develop their own skills and strengths. If material could be chosen on the basis of its merits rather than simply because it has been put in the curriculum, then what is selected may be taught to a depth that would serve some purpose. There is, of course, a counter-argument, which claims that such open guidelines could lead to vast differences in standards between schools. What one teacher may see as essential for a student’s education, another may see as irrelevant, and this will result in students with widely different educational strengths.

E. With such a high-pressure learning environment, there are also a number of social aspects to schooling which need to be considered. The increased student workload cannot be covered in the classroom alone for the simple reason that there is not enough time in the average school week, and much of this extra workload has been pushed into the realm of homework. At its best, homework should be the opportunity to look in greater detail at what has been studied. In other words, to actually think about it and its relevance. The reality, however, is often very different. Concerned parents and overextended students are finding that homework is taking an increasingly large part of a student’s evening, cutting into time many feel should be spent as part of a child’s social education. Other social pressures have compounded the situation, as many of the areas of educating a young child which should be the responsibility of the parents have ill-advisedly become the school’s responsibility. Drug awareness and health issues, for example, are occupying an increasingly large part of the school day.

F. Many people believe that we should be teaching less, but teaching it better, and it is here that they think a solution can be found. Yet the process of rewriting a curriculum to incorporate only that which is essential but can be well learned would take far longer than most educational authorities have, and would be considered by many to be a ‘regressive’ step. Changes in the curriculum have largely been motivated by changes in the nature of employment, as job mobility demands that people know something about considerably more areas than were traditionally necessary. A little about a lot allows for the job mobility which has become so common. No matter what the final verdict regarding the curriculum may be, one thing is for sure – change will be slow, and not always for the best.

Questions 28 – 40

Questions 28 – 32

Choose the most suitable headings for sections B–F from the list below. Use each heading once only.

  1. A question of time
  2. Lack of teacher training
  3. Student success
  4. The argument for flexibility
  5. Importance of teaching experience
  6. Extra-curricular pressures
  7. The benefits of a varied curriculum
  8. Imbalanced focus
  9. Over-reliance on examinations
  10. The risks of quality over quantity?

  1. Section B     Show answerVIII
  2. Section C     Show answerIX
  3. Section D     Show answerIV
  4. Section E     Show answerVI
  5. Section F     Show answerX – the paragraph is talking about teaching less (quantity) , but making it better (quality). The risks are that is could appear regressive and that the job market today often requires people to know a little about a wide range of topics.

Questions 23 – 37

Do the following statements agree with the views of the writer?

In boxes 33 -37 on your answer sheet write

Write YES if the statement agrees with the writer
NO if the statement does not agree with the writer
NOT GIVEN if there is no information about this in the passage

  1. Classes are often too short.     Show answerNOT GIVEN
  2. No subjects can be comprehensively learned without time to discuss and debate the facts.     Show answerNO
  3. Tests are a fair measure of ability.     Show answerNO
  4. Schools are trying to be responsible for too many aspects of a child’s education.     Show answerYES
  5. Future changes in the curriculum are estimated to rapidly improve the situation.     Show answerNO – the text states that ‘change will be slow’

Questions 38 – 40

Complete the summary below using NO MORE THAN TWO WORDS from the text.

Too much emphasis is placed on learning (38)    . The modern school curriculum is largely a response to increased (39)    for which graduates are expected to have a much broader general knowledge. One potential solution to this could be to give individual schools (40)    regarding what is taught.

38. Show answerFacts

39. Show answerJob mobility

40. Show answerMore discretion

Show All correct answers

Once you have finished, check your answers then visit the IELTS band score converter to see what your band score would be.

 

Free IELTS General Training Reading test 2 Section 3

Free IELTS General Training Reading test 2 Section 3

Go back to Section 1 | Go back to Section 2

This free IELTS reading test (General Training) has the same question types, content style, length and difficulty as a standard IELTS test. To get started simply scroll down to read the texts and answer the questions.

Free IELTS General Training Reading test 2 Section 3Looking for more reading practice tests? Our online course has over 15 complete practice tests as well as end of lesson tests and reading texts used in the lessons.

Important notes before you begin this section of the test:

  • There is a box beside each question for you to write your answer
  • When you have finished (or after any question) click the ‘Show answers’ link to see the answer(s) and an explanation
  • When you have finished on this page, count the number of correct answers you have and make a note. When you have completed the full test, go to the band score converter to find out your approximate IELTS band score

When you have finished, take a note of the number of correct answers, then move on to Section 3.

Section 3

The dawn of culture

In every society, culturally unique ways of thinking about the world unite people in their behaviour. Anthropologists often refer to the body of ideas that people share as ideology. Ideology can be broken down into at least three specific categories: beliefs, values and ideals. People’s beliefs give them an understanding of how the world works and how they should respond to the actions of others and their environments. Particular beliefs often tie in closely with the daily concerns of domestic life, such as making a living, health and sickness, happiness and sadness, interpersonal relationships, and death. People’s values tell them the differences between right and wrong or good and bad. Ideals serve as models for what people hope to achieve in life.

There are two accepted systems of belief. Some rely on religion, even the supernatural (things beyond the natural world), to shape their values and ideals and to influence their behaviour. Others base their beliefs on observations of the natural world, a practice anthropologists commonly refer to as secularism.

Religion in its more extreme form allows people to know about and ‘communicate’ with supernatural beings, such as animal spirits, gods, and spirits of the dead. Small tribal societies believe that plants and animals, as well as people, can have souls or spirits that can take on different forms to help or harm people. Anthropologists refer to this kind of religious belief as animism, with believers often led by shamans. As religious specialists, shamans have special access to the spirit world, and are said to be able to receive stories from supernatural beings and later recite them to others or act them out in dramatic rituals.

In larger, agricultural societies, religion has long been a means of asking for bountiful harvests, a source of power for rulers, or an inspiration to go to war. In early civilised societies, religious visionaries became leaders because people believed those leaders could communicate with the supernatural to control the fate of a civilization. This became their greatest source of power, and people often regarded leaders as actual gods. For example, in the great civilisation of the Aztec, which flourished in what is now Mexico in the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries, rulers claimed privileged association with a powerful god that was said to require human blood to ensure that the sun would rise and set each day. Aztec rulers thus inspired great awe by regularly conducting human sacrifices. They also conspicuously displayed their vast power as wealth in luxury goods, such as fine jewels, clothing and palaces. Rulers obtained their wealth from the great numbers of craftspeople, traders and warriors under their control, often leaving them with nothing.

During the period in seventeenth- and eighteenth-century Europe known as the Age of Enlightenment, science and logic became new sources of belief for many people living in civilised societies. Scientific studies of the natural world and rational philosophies led people to believe that they could explain natural and social phenomena without believing in gods or spirits. Religion remained an influential system of belief, and together both religion and science drove the development of capitalism, the economic system of commerce-driven market exchange. Capitalism itself influences people’s beliefs, values and ideals in many present-day, large, civilised societies. In these societies, such as in the United States, many people view the world and shape their behaviour based on a belief that they can understand and control their environment and that work, commerce and the accumulation of wealth serve an ultimate good. The governments of most large societies today also assert that human well-being derives from the growth of economies and the development of technology.

Rapid changes in technology in the last several decades have changed the nature of culture and cultural exchange. People around the world can make economic transactions and transmit information to each other almost instantaneously through the use of computers and satellite communications. Governments and corporations have gained vast amounts of political power through military might and economic influence. Corporations have also created a form of global culture based on worldwide commercial markets. As a result, local culture and social structure are now shaped by large and powerful commercial interests in ways that earlier anthropologists could not have imagined. Early anthropologists thought of societies and their cultures as fully independent systems, but today, many nations are multicultural societies, composed of numerous smaller subcultures. Cultures also cross national boundaries. For instance, people around the world now know a variety of English words and have contact with American cultural exports such as brand-name clothing and technological products, films and music, and mass-produced foods.

In addition, many people have come to believe in the fundamental nature of human rights and free will. These beliefs grew out of people’s increasing ability to control the natural world through science and rationalism, and though religious beliefs continue to change to affirm or accommodate these other dominant beliefs, sometimes the two are at odds with each other. For instance, many religious people have difficulty reconciling their belief in a supreme spiritual force with the theory of natural evolution, which requires no belief in the supernatural. As a result, societies in which many people do not practice any religion, such as China, may be known as secular societies. However, no society is entirely secular.

Questions 23 – 40

Questions 23 – 29

Do the following statements agree with the opinion of the writer? Write
YES if the statement agrees with the writer
NO if the statement does not agree with the writer
NOT GIVEN if there is no information about this in the passage.

  1. Shamans act as intermediaries between spirits and the living.    Show answer Yes
  2. Agricultural societies benefited from religion.    Show answer Not Given
  3. All the people from the Aztec civilisation were rich.    Show answer No
  4. In the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, European people began turning towards science.    Show answer Yes

Questions 30 – 34

Complete the summary of the reading text using words from the box.

belief latter religion faith ascendancy
former rational decline animism shaman

There are two main (30)     systems which can contribute to our ideology – animism and secularism. The (31)     can be said to dominate older civilisations and tribal societies, whereas larger, more contemporary societies have gone in a more (32)     and scientific direction. One reason that explains the (33)     of more secular beliefs is the importance given to other factors, such as free will and capitalism. Nonetheless, (34)     remains at least to some degree even in the most secular of societies.

30.    Show answer Belief

31.    Show answer Former

32.    Show answer Rational

33.    Show answer Ascendancy

34.    Show answer Religion


Questions 35 – 40

Answer the questions below using NO MORE THAN THREE WORDS.

  1. What are beliefs, values and ideals specific categories of?     Show answer Ideology
  2. What was said to be necessary for the continuation of sunrise and sunset in ancient Mexico?     Show answer (Human) sacrifice OR (human) blood
  3. In Europe, what title was given to the advance of science and logic?     Show answer Age of Enlightenment
  4. What two things influenced the development of capitalism?     Show answer Religion and science
  5. Before modern advances in technology, what did anthropologists consider societies to be?     Show answer Fully independent systems
  6. What theory is symbolic of the tensions between religion and science?     Show answer Natural evolution

 

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Free IELTS General Training Reading test 2 Section 2

Free IELTS General Training Reading test 2 Section 2

Go back to Section 1 | Go to Section 3

This free IELTS reading test (General Training) has the same question types, content style, length and difficulty as a standard IELTS test. To get started simply scroll down to read the texts and answer the questions.

Free IELTS General Training Reading test 2 Section 2Looking for more reading practice tests? Our online course has over 15 complete practice tests as well as end of lesson tests and reading texts used in the lessons.

Important notes before you begin this section of the test:

  • There is a box beside each question for you to write your answer
  • When you have finished (or after any question) click the ‘Show answers’ link to see the answer(s) and an explanation
  • This is a General Training Section 2, which means there is either two or three short reading texts that you need to use to complete the section
  • When you have finished on this page, count the number of correct answers you have and make a note. When you have completed the full test, go to the band score converter to find out your approximate IELTS band score

Section 2


Section 2 – Part 1 of 3

Rules and Regulations for Members Bringing Guests and Children to the Leisure Centre

Members’ Guests over 18.

Members are welcome to introduce guests to the club. Guests are required to register, pay the current guest fee and must be accompanied by a Member.

Members must ensure that their guests are fully aware of the clubs Terms & Conditions and Rules & Regulations.

Each Member can introduce the same person no more than 6 times per year as a guest.

The owners take no responsibility for accidents, injuries, misadventure, theft or damage to personal belongings experienced by guests of the club.

Children

Members are allowed to bring their children to the leisure centre during certain hours. Children’s hours are Monday to Friday 10am – 12noon and 3pm – 5pm. At weekends and on national holidays children are allowed to use the centre between 12 noon – 4pm.

A child is any individual under 16. All under 16’s should be supervised by an adult (over 18) when using the facilities during children’s hours. At age 17 all users must pay an adult membership fee.

Children under the age of 12 are not allowed to use the steam room, hot spa or sauna.


Questions 11-14 are based on the reading passage above.

Complete each sentence with the correct ending A-G below.

Write the correct letter A-G in boxes 11-14 on your answer sheet.

  1. before 12 noon on workdays.
  2. cannot use all leisure centre facilities
  3. up to six occasions under guest terms.
  4. may use the spa in the company of an adult.
  5. unless a member is with them
  6. during times it is open to children.
  7. after 5pm on week days

11. Adult guests are not allowed to use the facilities
Show the answer

E

‘Guests are required to register, pay the current guest fee and must be accompanied by a Member.’

12. Non members can visit the gym
Show the answer

C

‘Each Member can introduce the same person no more than 6 times per year as a guest.

13. Children are not allowed to use the leisure centre
Show the answer

G

‘Children’s hours are Monday to Friday 10am – 12noon and 3pm – 5pm. At weekends and on national holidays children are allowed to use the centre between 12 noon – 4pm.’

14. 11 year olds
Show the answer

B

‘Children under the age of 12 are not allowed to use the steam room, hot spa or sauna.’


Section 2 – Part 2 of 3

Negotiating a pay rise

For many people, one of the hardest discussions they have with senior management is about a raise in pay. Employees often choose to look for a better paid position within another company rather than face their own boss, but that is a situation that can have a negative impact on the employee (who is seen to lack loyalty to the company) and the employer (who stands to lose a trained staff member who works well and has a good knowledge of the company). However, there are some salary negotiation tactics that might just help.

The most common error is, when finally gathering the courage to address the situation, many employees simply immediately accept whatever offer is first made. Research shows that younger job-seekers and female job-seekers often make this mistake – either from not completely understanding the negotiation process or from a dislike or discomfort with the idea of negotiating. There is, of course, the financial aspect of not receiving a higher compensation, but more importantly this can have a significant effect on motivation and morale and can eventually lead an employee who hastily accepted an inadequate offer to begin to resent both the job and the employer.

Another common error is rating your required raise based on a value you personally need or would like. Few employers care whether you have enough money to pay for your mortgage or other bills, so negotiations should be based on your value to the company, based on good research of similar companies. Also, if possible, the actual figure aimed for in the negotiation should not be revealed until the last possible moment, giving as much flexibility as possible. Immediately blurting out a figure it then becomes clear the company will not meet puts both the employer and employee in an uncomfortable position.
As previously mentioned, one of the key factors in a successful salary negotiation is research and preparation. With the number and variety of salary resources available online — from salary.com and salaryexpert.com to professional associations – there should be no reason not to have an accurate market value in mind.

However, despite all the preparation and right attitude in the negotiation, there is another pitfall – declining an offer too quickly as it was lower than expected. A careful balance needs to be struck here; we have looked at the risks of accepting too quickly, but declining an offer can mean that the negotiation has nowhere to go. There are two points to consider at this juncture: a raise can also come in the form of other benefits such as better health cover, so if the money offered is low, think about discussing the perks of the job. The second point is that you have to be realistic – if the job market is low and the company is not having a particularly outstanding year, you may have to accept a lower offer. However, if this is the case, it is common to request a review of the salary at a time in the not-too-distant future.

The final point that is essential in any business negotiation is not to take any rejection or low offers personally. Employees should maintain a professional approach to their job, and a salary negotiation is no exception. If negotiations break down between you and the employer, move on graciously, thanking the employer again for the opportunity — because you never want to burn any bridges.


 

Questions 15-25

Read the information below and answer Questions 15-20

Do the following statements agree with the information given in the text on the previous page?

Write

TRUE if the statement agrees with the information

FALSE if the statement contradicts the information

NOT GIVEN if there is no information on this

15. A mistake equally common across all types of employee is the premature acceptance of the first offer for a pay rise.
Show the answer

FALSE

16. Employees can become demoralised despite having a pay raise.
Show the answer

TRUE

17. Many people are unsuccessful in salary discussions because of poor research.
Show the answer

NOT GIVEN – the text simply says that ‘one of the key factors in a successful salary negotiation is research and preparation’ – no mention of many people not researching.

18. It is important to be clear what pay rise is expected at the beginning of the negotiation.
Show the answer

FALSE – the actual figure aimed for in the negotiation should not be revealed until the last possible moment

19. A negotiation could include a discussion of other benefits as well as salary.
Show the answer

TRUE – ‘so if the money offered is low, think about discussing the perks of the job.’

20. You should avoid a pay negotiation when the employment market is not strong.
Show the answer

NOT GIVEN – the text only says ‘be realistic’

Section 2 – Part 3 of 3

6 Rules for writing a successful cover letter

Rule #1
The first rule of most job applications is simple –never send your CV without a cover letter. Without it, your application will seem unprofessional and unprepared, and equally importantly, you will miss out on an opportunity to start ‘selling’ your abilities and qualifications to the potential employer.

Rule #2
When starting your cover letter, it is important to address it to a named individual rather than a general salutation like ‘Dear Sir or Madam’. It is, of course, very important that your cover letter is tailored specifically for the position you are applying for – sending an almost identical cover letter and CV to 10 employers is less likely to success than specifically targeting 2 or 3 and adapting your application to highlight the key features you feel are most relevant for the position.

Rule #3
From there, the next step is the first paragraph, and this is the point at which employers often make the crucial decision whether to consider your application or reject it. Avoid beginning with a standard, non-specific phrase such as ‘I am writing with regard the position advertised in…’; instead, try to be a little more dynamic – ‘My experience in the service industry offers much to a company that seeks motivated individuals in its employment, and am eager to put my solid education to work in a position such as the one you advertised in ..’. Obvious statements such as ‘Please find my CV enclosed’ written in a cover letter should also be avoided – the potential employer will be well aware of what has been enclosed. In total, the cover letter should never spill on to a second page – if it does, then you haven’t been succinct enough.

Rule #4
In your letter, your aim should be to highlight the areas in which the company would benefit from having you as an employee; make sure that you don’t make the mistake of writing about how the job would be of benefit to you. For example, ‘I feel that working for such a dynamic company would suit my personality’ would be better phrased as ‘I feel that I could contribute to such a dynamic company.’

Rule #5
Other points to bear in mind about your letter are that you should always avoid negativity in any form, and make sure you have included a number of ways that the employer can contact you, even if that same information is on your CV. The more work you make the employer do to offer you the job, the less inclined they may be to actually offer it. When you have finished your cover letter, read it again carefully (ideally, ask a friend to read it as you might not notice typographical or grammatical errors you have made). Once that’s done, make sure that you sign the letter by hand, preferably in blue ink to stand out from darker, printed text.

Rule #6
The final point is that if you are serious about applying for the position and are keen to get an interview, you should take the initiative in your letter and tell the employer that you will follow up. Opinions vary, but it is generally acceptable to call 3 days after sending the CV, without necessarily waiting for the closing date for applications.

Questions 21-25

For which rules are the following statements true?

Write the correct letter A-F in boxes 21 – 25 on your answer sheet.

NB You may use any letter more than once.

  1. Rule #1
  2. Rule #2
  3. Rule #3
  4. Rule #4
  5. Rule #5
  6. Rule #6

21. Simplify for the employer


Show the answer

Rule #5 – “The more work you make the employer do to offer you the job, the less inclined they may be to actually offer it. ”

22. Don’t use redundant phrases


Show the answer

Rule #3 – “Obvious statements such as ‘Please find my CV enclosed’ written in a cover letter should also be avoided ”

23. Avoid generalisations


Show the answer

Rule #2 – “rather than a general salutation … very important that your cover letter is tailored specifically for the position you are applying for ”

24. Highlight your abilities to your employer.


Show the answer

Rule #1 – “‘selling’ your abilities and qualifications to the potential employer”

25. Keep it concise


Show the answer

Rule #3 – “In total, the cover letter should never spill on to a second page – if it does, then you haven’t been succinct enough.”

Show All correct answers


 

You have now completed Section 2. Take a note of the number of correct answers, then move on to Section 3.

Free IELTS General Training Reading test 2 Section 1

Free IELTS General Training Reading test 2 Section 1

Go to Section 2 | Go to Section 3

This free IELTS reading test (General Training) has the same question types, content style, length and difficulty as a standard IELTS test. To get started simply scroll down to read the texts and answer the questions.

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Section 1:

General Training Reading test 2 Section 1

Free IELTS General Training reading practice test

Once you have finished, click ‘Finish quiz’ to check your answers.

Free IELTS General Training Reading test 1 Section 1

Free IELTS General Training Reading test 1 Section 1

Section 1

Go to Section 2 | Go to Section 3

This free IELTS reading test (General Training) has the same question types, content style, length and difficulty as a standard IELTS test. To get started simply scroll down to read the texts and answer the questions.

Free IELTS General Training Reading test 1 Section 1Looking for more reading practice tests? Our online course has over 15 complete practice tests as well as end of lesson tests and reading texts used in the lessons.

When you have finished the test, click the ‘Finish quiz’ button. To see which of your answers were marked as correct or incorrect, click the ‘View questions’ button. When completed, move on to Section 2.

Section 1:

 

General Training reading test #1

Free IELTS General Training Reading test 4 Section 3

Go back to Section 1 | Go back to Section 2

This free IELTS reading test (General Training) has the same question types, content style, length and difficulty as a standard IELTS test. To get started simply scroll down to read the texts and answer the questions.

Free IELTS General Training Reading test 4 Section 3Looking for more reading practice tests? Our online course has over 15 complete practice tests as well as end of lesson tests and reading texts used in the lessons.

Important notes before you begin this section of the test:

  • There is a box beside each question for you to write your answer
  • When you have finished (or after any question) click the ‘Show answers’ link to see the answer(s) and an explanation. To have your answers automatically marked and instantly converted to a band score, join our complete online IELTS course
  • When you have finished on this page, count the number of correct answers you have and make a note. When you have completed the full test, go to the band score converter to find out your approximate IELTS band score

Section 3:

Weakness of the school system

A. By attempting to fit in as much as possible, the school day is continually being added to. In many ways, this would appear to be a good idea, as our knowledge and understanding of the world is always growing and it would seem logical to incorporate this into schools. The reality, however, has some decided drawbacks. There is a growing feeling amongst many that the modern school curriculum, in an effort to teach as many varied subjects as possible, is actually teaching students less. It seems that by constantly adding to what should be taught in the classroom, the classes are less focused, not offering the deeper learning that institutions perhaps should.

B. With classes sometimes only 30 minutes long, the overwhelming amount of information teachers are required to present often only gives students time to learn facts, not to think in any great detail about what they are being presented with. The problem is that students are not getting the opportunity to absorb what they are being taught as the curriculum expands in order to keep what has already been taught and supplement it with everything new that comes along. The weaknesses of such a system are clear – well informed though such students may be, there is the risk of an increasing number of graduates who have no real creative or intellectual ability. By denying students the opportunity to sit and think their way through problems, or even consider their own opinion, some schools are not always providing a truly educational atmosphere. There are, of course, certain aspects of education which need to be taught by simply inputting the information. Basic mathematics, for example. But there are many other subjects which could be best learned by having an opportunity to think and discuss what is being taught. Literature, writing and the social sciences are good examples of subjects which cannot be considered as ‘covered’ by a mass of information without the opportunity to discuss, debate or consider meaning or implications. There are also important social skills to be learned during such periods of open discussion, skills which are not addressed by an endless flow of teacher-centred information.

C. Teachers themselves have also voiced concerns about the amount of information they are required to impress upon their students. There is a feeling in many educational establishments that students are no longer being educated, but taught how to pass tests. In a world where academic success is too often measured by examination results, this is a serious concern. If there is too much information to simply be memorised and not enough time to truly assimilate it, what happens to students who fail to meet the grade? By current standards, they are failures, yet they may have great potential in areas not covered by the test and there are many students who, despite clear intellectual ability, simply do not perform well in tests. Again, the problem is one of focus, as education authorities are looking at the outcome of schooling rather than the content presented in the class.

D. It is here that many teachers feel the situation could be addressed at a local level. By giving more discretion to teachers, school courses could be tailored to suit the students rather than tailoring students to meet ever-expanding course requirements. In addition, by running a curriculum that gives options rather than defines an entire course, considerably more freedom would be possible. As it is, progression through most primary and secondary schools is regimented, and there is little room for students to identify and develop their own skills and strengths. If material could be chosen on the basis of its merits rather than simply because it has been put in the curriculum, then what is selected may be taught to a depth that would serve some purpose. There is, of course, a counter-argument, which claims that such open guidelines could lead to vast differences in standards between schools. What one teacher may see as essential for a student’s education, another may see as irrelevant, and this will result in students with widely different educational strengths.

E. With such a high-pressure learning environment, there are also a number of social aspects to schooling which need to be considered. The increased student workload cannot be covered in the classroom alone for the simple reason that there is not enough time in the average school week, and much of this extra workload has been pushed into the realm of homework. At its best, homework should be the opportunity to look in greater detail at what has been studied. In other words, to actually think about it and its relevance. The reality, however, is often very different. Concerned parents and overextended students are finding that homework is taking an increasingly large part of a student’s evening, cutting into time many feel should be spent as part of a child’s social education. Other social pressures have compounded the situation, as many of the areas of educating a young child which should be the responsibility of the parents have ill-advisedly become the school’s responsibility. Drug awareness and health issues, for example, are occupying an increasingly large part of the school day.

F. Many people believe that we should be teaching less, but teaching it better, and it is here that they think a solution can be found. Yet the process of rewriting a curriculum to incorporate only that which is essential but can be well learned would take far longer than most educational authorities have, and would be considered by many to be a ‘regressive’ step. Changes in the curriculum have largely been motivated by changes in the nature of employment, as job mobility demands that people know something about considerably more areas than were traditionally necessary. A little about a lot allows for the job mobility which has become so common. No matter what the final verdict may be, one thing is for sure – change will be slow, and not always for the best.

Questions 27 – 40

Questions 27 – 32

Choose the most suitable headings for sections A–F from the list below. Use each heading once only.

  1. A question of time
  2. Lack of teacher training
  3. Student success
  4. The argument for flexibility
  5. Importance of teaching experience
  6. Extra-curricular pressures
  7. The benefits of a varied curriculum
  8. Imbalanced focus
  9. Over-reliance on examinations
  10. Quality of quantity?
  1. Section A Show answerX
  2. Section B Show answerVIII
  3. Section C Show answerIX
  4. Section D Show answerIV
  5. Section E Show answerVI
  6. Section F Show answerI

Questions 23 – 37

Do the following statements agree with the views of the writer?

In boxes 33 -37 on your answer sheet write

Write YES if the statement agrees with the writer
NO if the statement does not agree with the writer
NOT GIVEN if there is no information about this in the passage

  1. Classes are often too short. Show answerNOT GIVEN
  2. No subjects can be comprehensively learned without time to discuss and debate the facts. Show answerNO
  3. Tests are a fair measure of ability. Show answerNO
  4. Schools are trying to be responsible for too many aspects of a child’s education. Show answerYES
  5. Future changes in the curriculum will improve the situation. Show answerNO

Questions 38 – 40

Complete the summary below using NO MORE THAN TWO WORDS from the text.

Too much emphasis is placed on learning (38) . The modern school curriculum is largely a response to increased (39) for which graduates are expected to have a much broader general knowledge. One potential solution to this could be to give individual schools (40) regarding what is taught.

38. Show answerFacts

39. Show answerJob mobility

40. Show answerMore discretion

Show All correct answers

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