Category Archives: IELTS Writing Task 2 (lessons)

Writing a conclusion to a Task 2 essay

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Writing a conclusion to a Task 2 essay

In Task II, your concluding sentence should summarise your argument as presented in the essay, but ideally should also end with either a speculation or a recommendation.

A speculation is when you estimate what may happen in the future. For example:

Unless more job opportunities are provided, the rate of unemployment will continue to rise.

A recommendation is something you think should happen. For example:

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It would perhaps be better to enforce an early retirement age so that younger people have more job opportunities.

Here are two possible endings to the Task II essay that follows:

Writing a conclusion to a Task 2 essayFor many people, the main purpose of education is to provide the necessary knowledge and training to obtain a job, yet there are also people who hold that any further education can be said to have potential in the job market. Agreeing with this latter view, this opinion will now be supported.

   Primarily, there is the difficulty in knowing exactly which course of study would have clear employment possibilities. For those students opting to study arts subjects such as English literature, there is no direct path; potential opportunities could include becoming a librarian, author or teacher, but none of these can be said to be direct. Yet there is undeniable value in studying these subjects, as they allow for a more open-minded view of the world, an attitude which would later be useful in a business setting.

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   Another point to consider is the job market itself. With many industries in a constant state of evolution, studying for a particular path of employment may be redundant as the industry could well have changed direction by the time of graduation, as can be seen by looking at the information technology industry. Moreover, at the time of entering university, the majority of people do not have a clear career path laid out and thus study courses which appeal to them rather than offer a clear future.

(212 words so far)

Speculation:

To sum up, if any course of education which has no clear path to employment is to be abandoned, it would first need to be decided which courses had a definite purpose. This would almost certainly lead to argument, and would undeniably have a detrimental effect on the culture of a country that opted to drop its arts related subjects.

Recommendation:

To sum up, perhaps the best solution would be to adopt a more developed system of apprenticeship and work training, so that students can be moulded alongside changes in the industry, while those students with unfocussed or general employment plans can continue with the current system.

Analysing IELTS Task 2 writing questions

Analysing IELTS Task 2 writing questions

Analysing IELTS Task 2 writing questionsBefore you can being preparing your answer to a Task 2 topic, you need to be sure you have fully understood what you are being asked to write about.

For this post, we will analyse a Task 2 essay that is asking you to challenge a point of view.

You should spend about 40 minutes on this task.

Write about the following topic.

Crime is increasing in many countries and prisons are becoming increasingly crowded. We should therefore return to the use of capital punishment.

Do you agree or disagree?

Give reasons for your answer and include and relevant examples or evidence from your own knowledge and experience. You should write at least 250 words.

As the instructions are always the same for Task II, we can ignore those and focus directly on the question. However, before you can begin to plan an answer, you need to be clear on exactly what you are being asked to write about.

Many Task II questions can be divided into three parts, and this can sometimes make it more difficult to identify what your focus should be.

Part 1: Crime is increasing in many countries and prisons are becoming increasingly crowded.

The first part is the general topic, which introduces the main question. This is commonly accepted as being true, so therefore your essay should not spend too much time on this aspect of the question.

Part 2: We should therefore return to the use of capital punishment.

The second part of the question is the specific topic. This is the section of the question that you need to focus on in your answer.

Part 3: Do you agree or disagree?

The final part of Task II are the task words, telling you what you should do. In this case, you are being asked whether you agree or disagree, which tells you that this is the first type of essay question (challenge a point of view). To find out more about the four types of essay question, take a look here.

However, it is important to remember that not all Task II questions have three parts. Sometimes you are only given a specific topic and task words. In the examples below, we can see that there is no general topic. The questions have only 2 parts – the specific topic and the task words.

  • People who do dangerous sports for pleasure should not be entitled to healthcare. Do you agree?
  • Fewer people are reading books these days. Suggest possible reasons why.

Now practice by looking at the essay titles below and decide what the main focus of your answer should be.

Analysing Task 2 questions

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Types of Task 2 essay

The four types of IELTS Task 2 essay

The four types of IELTS Task 2 essay

The four types of IELTS Task 2 essayThere are four IELTS Task 2 types in the writing test (Academic Module and General Training), and it is important to understand exactly which of the four types you are answering as this affect the organisation and structure of your work.

  • Give an opinion / challenge a point of view
  • Give solutions to a problem
  • Compare points of view
  • Discuss a given situation

The key to deciding which of the four types of essay you are writing about is given in the Task words (the words that tell you what you are required to do). Here are some examples:

Give an opinion / challenge a point of view

  • Do you agree or disagree?
  • Do you think that…?
  • To what extent do you agree or disagree?
  • Is this positive or negative?
  • Do the advantages outweigh the disadvantages?

Give solutions to a problem

  • What measures should be taken…?
  • What should be done about…?
  • What is the solution to this?
  • In your opinion, what are the solutions?

Compare points of view

  • Discuss both views and give you opinion
  • Consider both sides and give your view
  • Argue both views and give your opinion
  • Discuss the advantages and disadvantages

Discuss a given situation

  • What problem does this cause?
  • What benefits does this bring?
  • What factors contribute to?
  • What is the main cause of this?

In some situations, there are only minor differences between the task words that make the question slightly different.

Compare:

Do the advantages outweigh the disadvantages? (asking you to give an opinion or challenge a point of view)

Discuss the advantages and disadvantages (asking you to compare points of view)

In the first question, your answer could be structured with only a short reference to the advantages or disadvantages. However, in the second question, you are asked to divide your essay into equal parts of discussing both the advantages and disadvantages – a passing reference to one side of the argument here would be considered a poor structure.

Previous comments:
    Ozgur Coplu says:

    would give at least one example for ‘To what extent do you agree or disagree?’. How can we make a good assey when we face with ti?

    Irma Naj says:

    Can you please further elaborate on do the advantages outweigh the disadvantages type… as i think that 1st para will be introduction of background with my opinion that i agree that there are more advantages rather than disadvantages.. in 2nd and 3rd para there will be my point of view/thesis with examples and explanation in support of advantages… lime 1 para for 1 advantage .. in last para conclusion with restatement of my thesis.. so its more look like argument essay.. do you agree or disagree typee…. please reply

    Hi Irma – the recommendations we make are not the ONLY way to write a Task 2 essay, and your construction also sounds good. However, I would be careful about putting too much background in the first paragraph (assuming you mean the first body paragraph) as this is something that should be very briefly covered in the introduction if at all. Hope that helps! The team at http://www.IELTStestONLINE.com

Writing good body paragraphs for IELTS Task 2

Writing good body paragraphs for IELTS Task 2

Writing good body paragraphs for IELTS Task 2

In Task II, your essay should be composed of three distinct sections: the introduction, the body and the conclusion. On this page, we will look at writing a body paragraph.

Here is an example of a good body paragraph:

On one hand, there is a clear correlation between the availability of guns and the number of deaths or serious incidents they cause. Arguably these incident are not always intentional, they they occur nonetheless. In America, for example, it is a relatively simple process to acquire a firearm, and as a result the country suffers from one of the highest rate of gun related mortality in the western world.

The three parts of a good IELTS paragraph

A good body paragraph should have three parts: the topic sentence, the development and the example. In the paragraph above, this can be broken down like this.

The topic sentence On one hand, there is a clear correlation between the availability of guns and the number of deaths or serious incidents they cause.
The development Arguably these incidents are not always intentional but they occur nonetheless.
The example In America, for example, it is a relatively simple process to acquire a firearm, and as a result the country suffers from one of the highest rate of gun related mortality in the western world.

The topic sentence

Start by telling the examiner exactly what the paragraph is about. This should be the main argument of your paragraph. By reading the first sentence of each of your body paragraphs, the examiner should be able to see exactly what points your essay is making.

Practice by reading the paragraph below and deciding which topic sentence is most appropriate.

  1. It is important to analyse why stress has become so common.
  2. It is important to remember that there are positive and negative aspects to stress.
  3. The problems of stress are not particularly widespread; they mostly concern people in the workplace.

________________________________________. On the one hand, it is commonly linked with medical problems such as headaches and heart problems. It causes sufferers to become both less productive in the workplace and less sociable in their private lives. On the other hand, stress is a natural warning sign, telling us that we are in danger of overtaxing ourselves and giving us the opportunity to slow down. The combination of overwork, lack of relaxation and poor diet are all contributory factors.

Click here to see the correct answer
The paragraph refers to positive and negative points, so topic sentence B is best.

Practice creating a paragraph

Now practice putting together a paragraph. Put the sentences below in the correct order to create a complete body paragraph.

  1. There are also options for those who do not want to spend too much.
  2. Equipment, from rowing machines to workout videos, is readily available for those wishing to create their own home gym.
  3. This means that even people with limited time, such as those who work long hours, should still be able to find the opportunity to exercise regularly.
  4. Reasonable membership costs for local gyms and clubs provide ample opportunity for the amateur interested in a little exercise.
  5. These days, there are many ways to keep fit.
Click here to see the correct order

These days, there are many ways to keep fit. Equipment, from rowing machines to workout videos, is readily available for those wishing to create their own home gym. There are also options for those who do not want to spend too much. Reasonable membership costs for local gyms and clubs provide ample opportunity for the amateur interested in a little exercise. This means that even people with limited time, such as those who work long hours, should still be able to find the opportunity to exercise regularly.


Tips and hints for writing a body paragraph for Task II

It is important to know what your paragraph will be about before you start to write, so a good body paragraph always starts with planning. Make a quick note on the question paper about the topic sentence, the development and the example(s) you will use before you start to write!

Tips for the IELTS writing test

Tips for the IELTS writing test

On this page are tips and hints for writing in the IELTS test. If you have a question or a tip that you think would benefit others, let us know using the message form at the bottom of the page.

Start with Task II

The scoring system for IELTS means that your Task II essay is worth more than Task I. For example – if you get a 6.0 for Task I and a 6.5 for Task II, your overall score is 6.5. However, if you get a 6.5 for Task I and a 6.0 for Task II, your overall result is 6.0. that’s why it always pays to start with Task II! The answer sheet you are writing on has different areas for Task I and Task II, so there’s no problem completing them in any particular order.

Tips for the IELTS writing testDO NOT copy the title of the Task

This will not be counted in your word count and will be simply ignored by the examiner. However, it will cost you time which would be better spent in planning, writing or editing your work.

Making corrections to your completed written work

For the writing test, you will be given a pencil to write with (you are not allowed to take in any pens or material of your own), but if you have made a mistake or want to change something you have written, don’t waste time erasing it – simply put a line through it like this just put a line through it and carry on.

If you don’t understand the the question (or a word in the question)

The best way to handle this is by having a well structured introduction. By including a rephrased definition of what you think the question means, you may lose points for not answering the question directly, but you won’t lose further points for not being clear and to the point. Take a look at the Writing an introduction page for more information.

Is handwriting important in IELTS writing?

It doesn’t matter if your handwriting is not very neat and tidy, so long as the examiner can read it. You can write in cursive (where the letters are joined to each other) or you can print (where each letter is separate). You can even write in capital letters for the whole test if you want to (as confirmed here:http://takeielts.britishcouncil.org/prepare-your-test/test-day-advice/writing-test-advice – thanks to Ahmed El Talkawy for this link)

Make sure your paragraph breaks are clear

Accurate paragraphing is very important, so make sure that the examiner can clear see where your paragraph begins. Leave an empty line between each paragraph to make it very clear, and you can also indent your writing (that is, the first sentence of the paragraph should have a slight margin to the left). Also take a look at Writing better paragraphs.

Not writing enough words

The IELTS writing test is assessed based on 4 different criteria (as explained in the About the IELTS writing test page). Writing below the minimum word count in either Task I or Task II will mean your score for Task Completion will be reduced by up to 2 bands, so it is very important that you write at least 150 words in Task I and 250 words in Task II.

Writing too many words

For Task I, you should write at least 150 words and for Task II you should write at least 250 words. However, it is also a mistake to write too much beyond these limits. Writing too many words in the IELTS writing test can potentially reduce your overall score for two reasons. The first is that the examiner may penalise you for not being concise and getting to the point. The other, more common reason for losing points is that the more you write, the more you risk exposing additional errors to the examiner. The ideal number of words in the IELTS writing test should be around 10% above the required minimum – that’s 165 words for Task I and 275 words in Task II.

Get used to handwriting for an hour

This might sound like a strange tip, but these days very few people write by hand for more than a minute or two (in fact many people are quicker on a keyboard than with a pen!). It is essential that as part of your IELTS preparations, you hand-write for increasing periods of time until you can comfortably complete over 400 words (Task I and Task II) in less than an hour. Getting a cramp (an ache) in your hand as you are writing can slow you down and will make it more difficult to focus.

Plan, Plan, Plan!!!

One of the most common failings in IELTS writing is when it is clear from the essay that the candidate has not had a clear plan before they started to write. This can mean that your work does not logically flow, repeats vocabulary and is not well organised. Spending a few minutes making a rough plan of what you will include in each paragraph means that you can focus more on your sentence formation, vocabulary and grammar when actually writing. Although you are not given any ‘rough’ paper on which to make notes, you can write on the question paper (this is collected at the end of the test but is then destroyed, not kept with your answer).

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Getting ideas for IELTS Task 2

Getting ideas for IELTS Task 2

With only 40 minutes to read the question, get ideas, plan your essay, write the essay and then proofread your work, you need to be quick getting ideas.

Here are some useful methods of getting ideas:

Brainstorming

Getting ideas for IELTS Task 2

This simply means thinking about anything that is connected to the topic. It doesn’t matter whether or not the idea seems good at the time; the aim is to get your brain thinking about the topic and writing notes on the question paper. When you have finished brainstorming, you will find that some of your ideas don’t relate to the topic so need to be rejected, but at least you have a place to start.

If your Task II title was ‘Should parents be responsible for the criminal actions of their children?‘ you might think of the following ideas:

  • underage crime
  • bad parenting
  • crime rates in developed countries
  • young / busy parents
  • society
  • the child’s friends
  • TV and video games

Then when you look again through the list, you need to reject the ideas that are not directly relevant to the questions. In the example above, you would reject the idea about ‘crime rates in developed countries’, as this does not directly relate to parents or children. Then look again and see which ideas would be difficult to support or argue in 250 words / 40 minutes, and would probably reject ‘society’ as it is a very wide area.

Who’s involved?

Another method of getting ideas is to think about who is affected by the topic raised in the question. If you are thinking about ‘Should parents be responsible for the criminal actions of their children?‘, then the people involved would be:

  • parents
  • children
  • the police
  • the victims of crime
  • other criminals

Then you need to think about how each of the affected groups of people may react. Victims of crime, for instance, might want to see the parents punished as the child is arguably too young for prison. The police might also want parents to be responsible for the same reason.


Applying the questions words

A third useful method of getting ideas is to use the question words – who, what, where, when, how etc. In the example we have used so far (Should parents be responsible for the criminal actions of their children?‘), you could think about the following questions:

  • How could parents be punished?
  • What actions should the parents take responsibility for?
  • When is a child old enough to take responsibility themselves?

Here’s another example of applying question words:

TITLE: Everyone should be made to learn English. Do you agree or disagree?

You could consider aspects such as:

  • why should everyone have to learn?
  • what would happen to non-English people’s native language?
  • where would people study?
  • how would this be controlled/regulated?
  • who should pay for it?
  • when would many people find a use for English?

 


Always keep in mind that the ideas you support or argue against do not have to reflect your true opinion – if you find it easier to argue something that you don’t actually agree with, then do it!

IELTS Task 2 avoiding emotional language

IELTS Task 2 avoiding emotional language

A common error in the IELTS test is not writing in a formal, academic manner for Task 2. In this post, we will look at writing too emotionally.

IELTS Task 2 avoiding emotional languageCompare these two sentences  -which is better?

A: People who spend extended periods in front of a television could be exposed to the great risks of pain and suffering from health issues, as well as missing opportunities to spend time outdoors in the arms of mother nature.

B: People who spend extended periods in front of a television could potentially face related health issues, as well as missing opportunities to spend some time outdoors
.

The best sentence is B – although it is shorter, it is academic and formal. Referring to ‘pain and suffering’ and ‘the arms of mother nature’ are more suited to books or poetry, but not for an academic essay. Make sure your work is not excessive – remember you are writing at a level intended for a university lecturer, not a book club!

Here are some other ’emotional’ phrases that we have seen written in student essays that are definitely best avoided in Task 2:

  • It is with great joy and happiness
  • For it is the beauty of our world
  • Friendship in the heart is more valuable
  • We must be full of peace and love
  • The mind must be able to float like the wind
  • How can it be so if we love our brothers and sisters?
  • Living in sin can mean our souls are burdened

IELTS Task 2 Writing more academically

IELTS Task 2 Writing more academically

To write a good Task 2 essay for IELTS, you need to know how to
write more formally and to present yourself in an academic manner. This post will show you some of the common errors in the IELTS writing test
and how to avoid them.

Using personal pronouns (I / we / you / us etc)IELTS Task 2 Writing more academically

Compare these two sentences:

  1. I think that the government should support us by providing better healthcare.
  2. It can be argued that the government should support the population by providing better healthcare.

It should be clear that the second sentence is better as it avoid
using ‘I’ and ‘us’. One of the best ways of writing more formally and
avoiding personal pronouns is by using the passive tense.

Using emotional expressions

Compare these two sentences:

  1. People who spend extended periods in front of a
    television could be exposed to the great risks of suffering from health
    issues.
  2. People who spend extended periods in front of a television could potentially face related health issues.

As you can see, the first sentence is too dramatic and is not
suited for academic writing. You need to remain objective, not
passionate.

Using personal examples

Compare these two sentences:

  1. A friend of mine has been unable to find work recently as he does not have the right qualifications.
  2. It is common for people to be be unable to find work without the right qualifications

As you can see, the second sentence does not make the example
‘personal’ – this is a key point for getting a better result in the
IELTS writing test.

Using abbreviations

Compare these two sentences:

  1. These days, many companies don’t employ people who can’t use a computer.
  2. These days, many companies do not employ people who cannot use a computer.

Always write the full word, not abbreviations!

Using phrasal verbs

Compare these two sentences:

  1. Despite the health concerns, many people have difficulty in giving up smoking.
  2. Despite the health concerns, many people have difficulty in quitting smoking.

Phrasal verbs like ‘give up’, ‘take off’, ‘break down’ or ‘call
into’ are not considered formal and will reduce your score. There is
always a more formal equivalent for a phrasal verb.

Asking questions

Compare these two sentences:

  1. Could the government do more to support poor people?
  2. Many people wonder if there is anything more the government could do to support poor people.

Avoid writing direct questions (also called ‘rhetorical questions’) – they are not academic and will reduce your writing result.

Informal linking words

Compare these two sentences:

  1. First, the government should support people who are actively looking for work.
  2. Primarily, the government should support people who are actively looking for work.

Using more ‘academic’ linking words to connect your ideas will give you a better result.

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Writing good topic sentences for IELTS

Writing a good topic sentence for IELTS

To write in a clear and logical way, the first sentence of your paragraph should define what the rest of the paragraph will be discussing.

For example:

Tighter gun control or even the abolition of firearms would lead to a decrease in the number of deaths and injuries. This is because in many countries, access to this type of weapon is relatively easy, and this can cause incidents or accidents. For example, in the USA alone, accidental death from firearms accounts for over 1000 deaths per year.

Notice how the sentence in bold identifies what the paragraph relates to.

Here are some more topic sentences:

Paragraph A:

Writing good topic sentences for IELTSReality television could be facing a revolt. Every night there is at least one on the television, more often two or three. Subjects can range from seeing a group of people living in a house together, with cameras watching them 24 hours a day, to more exotic locations where people, even celebrities, live on a deserted island and are required to complete certain tasks. While there is clearly a market for this kind of entertainment, there are a growing number of people who have become bored with this genre of programming and are refusing to watch, preferring instead to view other channels or even pursue other interests.

Paragraph B:

Computer viruses are becoming increasingly aggressive. Despite installing protective software, these threats continue to evolve, becoming increasingly sophisticated and damaging. This is an irritation to the home computer user, but is of far greater concern when they affect computers in government offices and banks, for example. In fact, it has been rumoured that certain software companies actively recruit the people responsible, thus turning the creation and implementation of viruses into something akin to a job interview.

Paragraph C:

The belief that we now have longer holidays is not always true. Take, for example, people working in the service industry. They are often required to work through what is traditionally considered to be the holiday period, and in many service industries, Christmas is one of their busiest times. Then there are people from the business world, constantly connected to their work through the Internet and mobile phones. The reality of the situation is that government legislation and laws regarding contracts have given us the impression of having more free time without actually reducing our workload.

Paragraph D:

An increasing number of women do not have to sacrifice their career in order to have a family. This is in part the result of legislation in favour of working mothers, in which companies are required to provide maternity pay to employees in the last stages of pregnancy and early motherhood. Returning to work is also facilitated by many of the larger companies providing crèches for younger children, meaning the parent is no longer housebound. There is also a trend towards having children later in life, once a career has been firmly established, or even not having children at all, giving the opportunity to follow career choices instead. A minor, and not yet substantial enough, role is also played by househusbands, men who take the responsibility for child care whilst the mother pursues her career.

 

Now practice! Read the paragraphs below and think of a suitable topic sentence for each one.

TOPIC SENTENCE 
It provides an important release from the tensions of the workplace, allowing us an outlet for our energies in an increasingly hectic world. There is also the social aspect, as people often use their leisure time to interact with others in a society that is becoming arguably less sociable.

Show a possible topic sentence for the paragraph above

FREE TIME IS INCREASINGLY VITAL THESE DAYS


 

TOPIC SENTENCE 
Traditional foods with better nutritional values are often overlooked as being time consuming and laborious and are often rejected in favour of more convenient options. Another reason that could account for this is the financial factor: the cost of a McDonald’s meal can often be considerably cheaper than a balanced and well-prepared meal cooked at home.

Show a possible topic sentence for the paragraph above  THERE IS AN INCREASING DEPENDENCE ON ‘JUNK’ FOOD

TOPIC SENTENCE 
The clearest indication of this is the brevity of most e-mails. In a letter, we would never consider communicating with a single word or phrase, yet it is perfectly acceptable to do so using a computer. There is also the personal aspect: reliance on e-mail communication is undeniably distancing us from more direct contact, even the telephone. However, we cannot underestimate the convenience of e-mail, especially in situations which involve long-distance communication.

Show a possible topic sentence for the paragraph above EMAIL IS NOT AS EFFECTIVE A MEANS OF COMMUNICATION COMPARED TO MORE TRADITIONAL FORMS

 

Task 2 IELTS writing – the basics Page 3

Task 2 IELTS writing – the basics Page 3

Before starting this lesson, make sure you’ve seen page 1 and page 2.

In the final page in this lesson, we will look at what might be the MOST important point regarding Task 2 writing – the 4 different types of Task 2, and the style you should use depending on which type it is.

Video 3 of 3

Narration:
Now let’s look at some examples of the four different types of Task II essays you may have to write about. The most common type of Task II requires you to give an opinion or challenge a point of view. Here is an example. The same question type could also be presented like this. You could also be given a question like this. The basic point of these questions is that you are presented with a situation or a statement that you have to give opinions about. The second type for Task II essay is when you are asked to compare points of view. Here is an example. Notice how the instructions tell us to discuss both the advantages and the disadvantages, then give an opinion. In this example, we are told to argue both opinions and give your view.

The way in which we approach essays that ask us to compare is slightly different to the type that asks us to give an opinion or challenge a point of view, as will be discussed later in the course. The final two types of Task II essay are the least common: we may be asked to give solutions to a problem or discuss a given situation; for instance, talking about benefits, causes or reasons. Here is an example of solutions essay. Here are examples of essays which require you to discuss a given situation. Knowing which type of essay you are writing about is important because it affects the way you plan and present your ideas. We will look at this in more detail later in the course, but on the next page you will see a list of common task words for the different essay types. You can often identify which type of Task II you are writing about from the task words themselves.


Here are some common task words that you might see for each Task 2 type:

Give an opinion / challenge a point of view

Do you agree or disagree?
Do you think…?
To what extent do you agree or disagree?
Do the benefits outweigh the drawbacks?
Is this positive or negative?
What is your opinion?

Compare points of view

Discuss both views and give your opinion.
Consider both sides and give your view.
Argue both views and give your opinion.
Discuss the two points and give your opinion.
Discuss the advantages and disadvantages.
Discuss the two situations and give your view.

Give solutions to a problem

What measures should be taken…?
What can be done about this?
What is the solution to this?
In your opinion what are the solutions?
How can the situation be improved?

Discuss a given situation

What problems does this cause?
What are the advantages of….?
In your opinion what are the problems associated with this?
What are the disadvantages of….?
What benefits does this bring?
What factors contribute to…?

Now practice!

Look at the Task 2 title below and select the question type you think it is.

A lot of people do business internationally. Therefore we should abolish passports to make it easier to travel. Do you agree or disagree?

Give an opinion / challenge a point of view
Compare points of view
Give solutions to a problem
Discuss a given situation

Show the answer
The correct answer is give an opinion / challenge a point of view.

There is a rising rate of obesity among children in developed countries. What can be done about this?

Give an opinion / challenge a point of view
Compare points of view
Give solutions to a problem
Discuss a given situation

Show the answer
The correct answer is give solutions to a problem.

The internet now allows fast access to a huge range of information. Do you think that libraries are still important?

Give an opinion / challenge a point of view
Compare points of view
Give solutions to a problem
Discuss a given situation

Show the answer
The correct answer is give an opinion / challenge a point of view.

Some people believe that the government should support the arts. Others believe that the money would be better spent on basic services such as healthcare. Discuss both points of view and give your opinion.

Give an opinion / challenge a point of view
Compare points of view
Give solutions to a problem
Discuss a given situation

Show the answer
The correct answer is compare points of view.

The rate of childhood obesity is rising in many developed countries. Why do you think this is?

Give an opinion / challenge a point of view
Compare points of view
Give solutions to a problem
Discuss a given situation

Show the answer
The correct answer is discuss a given situation.

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