IELTS Task 2 Writing more academically

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IELTS Task 2 Writing more academically

To write a good Task 2 essay for IELTS, you need to know how to
write more formally and to present yourself in an academic manner. This post will show you some of the common errors in the IELTS writing test
and how to avoid them.

Using personal pronouns (I / we / you / us etc)IELTS Task 2 Writing more academically

Compare these two sentences:

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  1. I think that the government should support us by providing better healthcare.
  2. It can be argued that the government should support the population by providing better healthcare.

It should be clear that the second sentence is better as it avoid
using ‘I’ and ‘us’. One of the best ways of writing more formally and
avoiding personal pronouns is by using the passive tense.

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Using emotional expressions

Compare these two sentences:

  1. People who spend extended periods in front of a
    television could be exposed to the great risks of suffering from health
    issues.
  2. People who spend extended periods in front of a television could potentially face related health issues.

As you can see, the first sentence is too dramatic and is not
suited for academic writing. You need to remain objective, not
passionate.

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Using personal examples

Compare these two sentences:

  1. A friend of mine has been unable to find work recently as he does not have the right qualifications.
  2. It is common for people to be be unable to find work without the right qualifications

As you can see, the second sentence does not make the example
‘personal’ – this is a key point for getting a better result in the
IELTS writing test.

Using abbreviations

Compare these two sentences:

  1. These days, many companies don’t employ people who can’t use a computer.
  2. These days, many companies do not employ people who cannot use a computer.

Always write the full word, not abbreviations!

Using phrasal verbs

Compare these two sentences:

  1. Despite the health concerns, many people have difficulty in giving up smoking.
  2. Despite the health concerns, many people have difficulty in quitting smoking.

Phrasal verbs like ‘give up’, ‘take off’, ‘break down’ or ‘call
into’ are not considered formal and will reduce your score. There is
always a more formal equivalent for a phrasal verb.

Asking questions

Compare these two sentences:

  1. Could the government do more to support poor people?
  2. Many people wonder if there is anything more the government could do to support poor people.

Avoid writing direct questions (also called ‘rhetorical questions’) – they are not academic and will reduce your writing result.

Informal linking words

Compare these two sentences:

  1. First, the government should support people who are actively looking for work.
  2. Primarily, the government should support people who are actively looking for work.

Using more ‘academic’ linking words to connect your ideas will give you a better result.

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