True False Not Given questions

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True False Not Given questions

This type of question can be particularly difficult, especially when you need to decide whether the answer is NOT GIVEN or FALSE. Here’s a very simple example of this question type:

Text: Training to become a doctor involves long hours and little pay, and many trainees do not complete the course.

Q1. Trainee doctors are well paid. THIS IS CLEARLY FALSE – THE TEXT STATES THAT IT INVOLVES ‘LITTLE PAY’

Q2. It takes a long time to become a doctor. THIS IS NOT GIVEN – THE TEXT STATES THAT THEY WORK LONG HOURS (MEANING MORE THAN THE TYPICAL 8 HOURS A DAY) BUT DOESN’T SAY HOW LONG IT TAKES TO QUALIFY AS A DOCTOR

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Q3. Some trainees do not study the full qualification. THIS IS TRUE – THE TEXT STATES THAT ‘MANY TRAINEES DO NOT COMPLETE THE COURSE’.

 

Try your skills with these TRUE / FALSE / NOT GIVEN exercises, but be careful – the text uses a lot of qualifying words (a common IELTS ‘trick’!).

Are the statements below the text TRUE, FALSE or NOT GIVEN? The questions are below the text.

 What is culture?

True False Not Given questions

Culture is defined as the ‘socially transmitted behaviour patterns, arts, beliefs, and institutions that are the expression of a particular class, community or period’  (www.dictionary.com). To most people, this  is seen in terms of books, paintings, rituals  and ceremonies, but recently there has  been a new entrant in the field of what is   considered to be ‘culture’ – the Internet.

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On the Internet, science & art, media and mind combine to create a modern culture which is far more widespread than any of its predecessors. Not referring to the casual user who has no particular interest in the Internet, active supporters of the Internet as a culture have given themselves nomenclature to reflect their cultural aspirations – they are the new cyberpoets. A cyberpoet can be defined as ‘one who makes frequent trips to the edge of technology, society and traditional culture and strives to be artful in their use of virtual space’.

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Supporter or opponent of this new culture, there is little doubt that the Internet offers a lot to our traditional view of culture. In just a few minutes in front of a keyboard, we can read almost anything that has ever been written, yet no paper had to be made, no library had to stay open and thus the cost remains minimal. All of this encourages even the casual surfer to explore further than he or she otherwise would have. The same effect can be observed with works of art. Previously available to be viewed only in museums if they were not in the hands of private collectors, all but a few famous works are now replicated on the Internet.

Yet the Internet is not merely a mirror of traditional culture – it is also a new culture in its own right. The medium of the Net allows for wider distribution and new platforms for most forms of art. ‘Kinetic art’ and other such computerised art forms occur with increasing regularity, both motivated by and generating an upsurge in popular and computer-mediated art.

In addition, if culture is said to be ‘socially transmitted’, then the Internet is remarkable in its ability to share, on an almost global scale, all the factors that constitute culture. We have only to hear the influence of jargon as we visit dub-dub-dub dot sites and surf the web to see how international the Internet has become to the majority.

Very few people would disagree that the cyberpoets are increasingly asserting themselves into popular culture. What is not so certain is how far this will go, as the Internet continues to assimilate more and more forms of culture, reaching global audiences. It is not inconceivable that our entire perception of culture will soon become cyber-focused.

Now answer the questions below. When you have finished, click ‘Finish quiz’. To see which of your answers were correct and the explanations why, click ‘View questions’.

Are the statements TRUE, FALSE or NOT GIVEN according to the text?

1. The majority of people consider ‘culture’ to be represented by traditional forms of art and literature.

click here to see the answer
True – Paragraph A states “To most people, this is seen in terms of books, paintings, rituals and ceremonies”

 

2. The internet as a culture is not extensive.

click here to see the answer
False – Paragraph B states ‘On the Internet, science and art, media and mind combine to create a modern culture which is far more widespread than any of its predecessors’. This is further supported later in Paragraph D, ‘The medium of the Net allows for wider distribution and new platforms for most forms of art’ therefore the internet as a culture IS extensive.

 

3. Through the Internet, every written word can be accessed.

click here to see the answer
False – the key here was to identify the qualifying word ‘every’ – Paragraph C states ‘In just a few minutes in front of a keyboard, we can read almost anything that has ever been written’ – almost is not a synonym for every.

 

4. The Internet provides a stage for all forms of art.

click here to see the answer
False – as with question 18, the key is in the qualifying word – the question says ‘all forms of art’, but Paragraph D states ‘most forms of art’

 

5. An insignificant number remain unaffected by the international nature of the Internet.

click here to see the answer
Not given – Paragraph E refers to the international nature of the internet, but we are not given specifics on numbers that are affected.

 

6. Only a few people believe that ‘cyberpoets’ are becoming part of our popular culture.

click here to see the answer
False – the text states ‘Very few people would disagree’ (Paragraph F) – very few would disagree means most would agree, which contradicts ‘Only a few people believe’ in the question.
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